eLetters

498 e-Letters

published between 2001 and 2004

  • Archimedes Vs Cochrane
    J Harry Baumer

    Dear Editor

    I read with interest the article in January's Archimedes [1] on the use of dexamethasone in bacterial meningitis. This particularly caught my eye as the department is engaged in a debate about the efficacy of this treatment in meningococcal meningitis.

    A recent Cochrane systematic review [2] addresses this specific point and recommended the use of dexamethasone, based on ten randomised con...

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  • Author's Reply: Rubbing Salt in the Wound
    Mark Hatherill

    Dear Editor

    Furness and Saravasiddhi make a valid point in emphasizing that intravenous maintenance fluid should not be routine [1]. However, there are common situations in which enteral feeding, whether oral, nasogastric, or nasojejunal, is either impossible or inadvisable [2]. These may include the immediate pre- or post-operative period, major trauma, severe vomiting, and respiratory or central nervous system i...

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  • Reply to Tommasini et al: Mass Screening with Tissue Trans Glutaminase for Coeliac Disease
    Rafeeq Muhammed

    Dear Editor

    We read with interest the study by A Tommasini and colleagues on mass screening for coeliac disease using antihuman transglutaminase antibody (tTG-ab) assay. We found it surprising that only three out of ten subjects who were positive for tTG-ab and negative for anti endomysium antibodies (AMA) could be biopsied. This is due to the fact that the authors decided they would biopsy only subjects who were...

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  • Where's the effect?
    Richard B. Mailman

    Dear Editor

    Having been an interested observer to the Feingold Hypothesis many years ago, I was startled to see it rise from the dead (highlighted in many medical excerpting services).

    I eagerly downloaded this article, and shortly thereafter, my thoughts could be paraphrased in a well-done American advertisement: "Where's the meat?"

    Figure 3 screamed at me one obvious conclusion: "Parents a...

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  • SLIT - relevance to the UK?
    Julia E Clark

    Dear Editor

    I was interested in this review, having read the previous Cochrane review that the authors here say had two studies wrongly not included.

    SLIT in children has been trialed mainly in Italy and is of major interest to anyone dealing with allergy and rhinitis.

    It is frustrating therefore, that SLIT is unavailable to children here in the UK and indeed, one of the only manufacturers famil...

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  • Reply to Dr Huw Thomas
    J Harry Baumer

    Dear Editor

    Dr Thomas asks for clarification on one aspect of the clinical guideline that I reviewed.

    I should emphasise that I was not involved in the development of this clinical guideline. I have sought a response from the first author and have received the following advice.

    The guideline in question suggests admission for a minimum of 2 hours for any child who presents with a febrile seizure who is b...

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  • Stature and personality function
    Jan-Maarten Wit

    Dear Editor

    We have read with much interest the article entitled "Personality functioning: the influence of stature" of Ulph et al.[1] It elegantly describes the effect of short stature in childhood as well as in young adulthood on personality functioning in a population-based study. The paper concludes that "no evidence was found that stature per se significantly affected the psychosocial functioning of t...

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  • Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy in Paediatric Practice
    Rajesh Gupta

    Dear Editor

    The article by Sleigh et al.[1] addresses an important paediatric dilemma.

    PEG is an accepted mode of nutritional support for children with long term needs. Its advantages in the form of better nutritional status and less stress and feeding time for the families have been well recognized. However, the complications associated with this procedure have been a matter of concern in most paedi...

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  • MRSA bacteraemia is different on a neonatal unit compared to a paediatric unit.
    Sarah J Denniston

    Dear Editor

    Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteraemia among children in a district general hospital: Neonatal unit and Paediatric Unit data are different.

    We were very interested to read Khairulddin et al's report. MRSA now causes 40% of all Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia (SAB) in England and Wales, and is increasing in frequency among the under 15-year-old population. Khai...

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  • Should routine maintenance intravenous fluids be used?
    John C Furness

    Dear Editor

    We were interested to read the challenging leading articles in the May issue of ADC, “Research in general paediatrics,” [1] and, “What routine intravenous maintenance fluids should be used? “ [2]

    We wondered if the papers were a deliberate challenge to a trial of isotonic versus hypotonic intravenous maintenance fluids in DGHs? On further consideration we felt that this may not be the corre...

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