eLetters

498 e-Letters

published between 2001 and 2004

  • Medication errors are NOT uncommon
    Neil A Caldwell
    Dear Editor,

    We welcome the coverage given to the major, and potentially fatal, problem of medication errors within managed health care.[1] We disagree however with the key message that MEDICATION ERRORS ARE UNCOMMON. They are endemic, extremely common, overlooked and often ignored.

    Observational studies of medicine administration within hospitals in the United Kingdom report an error rate of 3% to 8%.[2] In co...

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  • The need for further evidence for the proposed role of Helicobacter pylori in SIDS
    Caroline Blackwell
    Dear Editor,

    We read with interest the article by Kerr et al "An association between sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and Helicobacter pylori infection". While the proportion of samples positive for H pylori DNA were significantly higher in the SIDS group compared with the control group, the findings need to be interpreted with caution.

    PCR is a useful tool for detection of DNA. It is, however, evidence...

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  • Xylitol is available in America
    W McLean
    Dear Editor,

    Xylitol is now available in America in health food stores and via the internet. Parents of children with recurrent ear infection are making their own syrup with xylitol granules or purchasing supplements that contain it. They can also obtain xylitol nasal sprays. Research is needed on the minimum dose that is effective but as more parents discover the benefits the use of xylitol will increase.

  • Re: Continuing professional development in child health surveillance
    Mitch Blair
    Dear Editor,

    Dr Nathwani has highlighted an important area in relation to training and child health surveillance. Once we are clear about what we need to do, the next step is to (further) develop a competent workforce to provide the service as prescribed. To date, most Districts have interpreted RCGP (Royal College of General Practitioners) and BPA (British Paediatric Association; pre Royal College) guidance locally in or...

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  • Doing research: A challenge for district paediatricians
    Ashok Nathwani
    Dear Editor,

    I hope the message from this letter is not that paediatricians in district hospitals stop doing research. The challenge is to allow an environment in which clinical research can flourish.

  • Re: Are cuffed endotracheal tubes really indicated in the management of meningococcal disease?
    Andrew J Pollard

    Dear Editor,

    Pedley et al[1] raise concerns about the risk of upper airway trauma resulting from the use of cuffed endotracheal tubes (ETT) in paediatric airway management and indicate that they prefer to avoid the use of cuffed tubes in the acute management of children with meningococcal disease.

    Experience from neonatal intensive care, paediatric anaesthesia and paediatric intensive care indicate that...

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  • Continuing professional development in child health surveillance
    Ashok Nathwani
    Dear Editor

    This paper[1] on the role of a coordinator in child health surveillance/promotion (CHS) is both opportune and timely given the degree of interest generated in preventive healthcare for a variety of reasons. Blair has brilliantly summarised the activities covered by the programme that needs coordinating. One aspect which needs to be highlighted further is the area of training.

    The author has quite r...

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  • Bad news will be unpleasant
    Charles Essex
    Dear Editor

    Bad news is called bad news because it is … bad news. To be told that their child has cerebral palsy is devastating for parents and it is naïve to expect parents to be anything other than deeply distressed.

    Baird et al interviewed parents to ask their views and feelings about how the bad news was broken to them.[1] Firstly, there are two sides to every story. They did not interview the doctors...

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