eLetters

1586 e-Letters

  • Re: Effect of severity of disability on survival in north east England cerebral palsy cohort
    J L Hutton

    Dear Editor,

    We thank David Strauss for his interest in our work but he fails to substantiate his claims that there are 'substantial problems' with it.

    First, we wish to correct an error on page 470 (Arch. Dis. Child. 2000; 83: 470), column 2, line 11, `dying before' should read 'surviving until'.

    With regard to Strauss's remarks on LAS, both the abstract and the results section include th...

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  • Re: Oral steroids and inflammatory markers in asthma
    Claire Hogg

    Dear Editor,

    We thank Dr Grigg for his interest in our work.[1] We agree that the asthma attacks may have resolved spontaneously in some cases, which was precisely why we stated that the markers fell in association with steroid therapy, and nowhere implied causality. Nevertheless, the statistical analysis suggests that the chances this occurred at random are extremely low.

    We agree that corticosteroid...

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  • Dietary products used in infants for treatment and prevention of food allergy
    Arnaldo Cantani

    Dear Sir

    Professor Salazar-De-Sousa,[1] commenting on the recent paper by Høst et al,[2] maintains that recent prospective and randomised clinical studies have shown that soy protein (SP) is as allergenic as cow's milk (CM) protein citing a review paper[3]; however, the author failed to detail which are these studies.

    In 1990 we demonstrated[4] that Eastham et al[5] have shown an antibody response to SPs in...

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  • Role of high dose methylprednisolone treatment in patients with nephrotic syndrome
    Erol Erduran

    Dear Editor,

    I read with great interest a manuscript reported by Hodson et al in the journal (2000;83:45-51. The authors discussed various corticosteroid treatment protocols in patients with nephrotic syndrome (NS). They suggested that children in their first episode of NS should be treated with prednisone for at least three months with an increase in benefit being shown for up to seven months of treatment.

    ...

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  • Why anyone?
    Peter Daish
    Dear Editor,

    Liz Donovan's fascinating article certainly suggests that the big finger is pointing at her. However, although her calculation is numerically correct (and how nice to find someone using non-US billions) the reasoning is a little suspect.

    First multiplying the probabilities gives the odds against these seven rare conditions presenting in the order indicated; her final figure should be divided by 7...

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  • Methodology for assessing patterns of interstitial pneumonia in children
    Andrew G Nicholson

    Dear Editor:

    The report of Hacking et al,[1] of a series of infants with very early onset interstitial lung disease (ILD) with good prognosis, is of great clinical interest but sadly represents a lost investigative opportunity.

    Firstly, their statement that percutaneous open lung biopsy has fewer side effects than open lung biopsy (OLB) is not supported by any direct comparative trial, and cannot be allow...

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  • Hope and spina bifida
    THHG Koh

    Dear Editor

    Our group has been evaluating ways[1] of empowering parents to promote family centred care in the neonatal intensive care unit.[2] We therefore read with interest the important article showing parental hope to be more strongly associated with the health related quality of life (HRQL) than neonatal or current physical deficits.[3]

    Hope is prevalent amongst parents and staff in the neonatal in...

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  • Lumbar puncture should not be performed in meningococcal disease
    Simon Nadel
    Dear Editor:

    I was dismayed to see your publication of the letter by Dr Sam regarding the role of lumbar puncture in meningococcal disease.[1] While fully understanding the need to get as much information as possible, the benefits of isolating the causative organism need to be weighed against the risk of causing clinical deterioration in a patient who may have cardiovascular compromise, and or, raised intracranial pressu...

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  • We need the full picture on both smacking and vaccinations
    Robert E Larzelere

    Dear Editor

    Dr Elliman is noted for his careful methodological analysis of vaccination studies,[1] but is not so careful in his recent analysis of physical punishment.[2]

    The American Academy of Pediatric's co-sponsored scientific consensus conference on corporal punishment used a more scientific approach than the Elliman-Lynch summary. First, it carefully defined spanking as a subset of corporal punish...

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  • Re: Methodology for assessing patterns of interstitial pneumonia in children
    Doug Hacking

    Dear Editor,

    Nicholson and Bush,[1] in response to our article reporting on a case series of 11 children presenting with pulmonary interstitial fibrosis over a 10 year period,[2] suggest that an investigative opportunity has been missed. We do not agree.

    Nicholson and Bush have repeated their previously reported criticism of percutaneous lung biopsy (PLB)[3] and have suggested that this technique is p...

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