eLetters

1479 e-Letters

  • Intestinal inflammation in CF - An alternative hypothesis
    Larry Eisenberg

    Dear Editor:

    I was interested by the report of Smyth et al regarding the finding of markers of intestinal inflammation in whole gut lavage in patients with cystic fibrosis.[1] As the alpha 1 antitrypsin levels were not increased compared to controls, perhaps another hypothesis needs to be considered.

    Conceivably the inflammatory markers are not actually increased within the bowel, but rather, they are...

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  • Re: Dipsick examination of urine
    Sudhin Thayyil Sudhan

    Dear Editor,

    Our study[1] was done on a selected group of children who were at an increased risk of having urinary tract infection (UTI). The inclusion criteria were the presence of any of the following

    1. Clinical suspicion of UTI
    2. History of previous UTI or renal anomalies
    3. Children requiring antibiotics (urine culture was send prior to starting antibiotics)...

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  • Oral steroids and inflammatory markers in asthma
    Jonathan Grigg
    Dear Editor:

    Although the paper of El-Radhi et al[1] presents interesting data about decreases in inflammatory markers during the resolution of acute asthma, some of their conclusions are not valid. First, acute asthma has a tendency to resolve without corticosteroid therapy.[2] Since all of the children with acute asthma (quite rightly) received steroids, the observed effect may equally reflect processes associated wit...

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  • Dipstick testing of urine
    N Sharief

    Dear Editor:

    We read with interest the letter by Thayyil-Sudhan and Gupta[1] reporting their study on the role of dipsticks in the detection of urinary tract infection in children. We believe that this is a very important subject and wish to comment on the report and their conclusions in the light of our published study.[2]

    We note that 188 urines were not sent for culture, it is not therefore possible to d...

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  • "I do not want my baby vaccinated"
    Ashok Nathwani

    Dear Editor:

    How many times do general practitioners here parents say "I do not want my baby vaccinated"? Quite often, I guess. As vaccine uptake rates are maintained at high levels, notifications of the diseases prevented by them have fallen. As the incidence of these diseases have fallen from the public consciousness, public attention has deviated from these nasty diseases to its side effects. The paper from Go...

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  • Imaging the less seriously injured child
    Loretta Light
    Dear Editor

    I read with interest the article on Imaging the Less Seriously Head Injured Child.[1]

    The authors state that bruising with a yellow hue suggests that injury occurred at least 48 hours earlier. Unfortunately this statement is not referenced and the main articles I am aware of on the age and colour of bruising are those of Stevenson and Bialas published in ADC in 1996,[2] Schwartz & Ricci, 1996,...

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  • Community paediatrics - a misnomer
    Ashok Nathwani

    Dear Editor:

    Stewart-Brown's paper on the compatibility of medical practice in community paediatrics with that in public health[1] is a superlative effort. This is more so as it has come at a time when community paediatrics is being actively discussed by the RCPCH (UK Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health) for a variety of reasons but, perhaps, most importantly because it does not seem to attract enough...

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  • Re: Spacers and holding chambers: Not the last word, we hope
    Heather Zar

    Dear Editor

    Dr Mitchell is concerned that the methodology used in our study does not simulate the release of aerosol from a metered dose inhaler (MDI). As discussed in the article, the method of aerosol delivery in our study differs from that of a MDI but as the delivery system was kept constant and the particular spacer varied, a valid comparison of the efficacy of different spacers could be made.[1] This deli...

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  • Computer program to calculate percentage weight for height
    Bryan Lask
    Dear Editor

    Poustie et al state that there is no computer package available in the United Kingdom for calculating percentage weight for height (%WFH). This is incorrect and for many years there has been available just such a package entitled W4H under the copyright of Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Trust. The program can be used on any version of Windows from 3.1 onwards, Excel, and on Psion's. This p...

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  • Sweat chloride and conductivity
    H Lewis Webster

    Dear Editor

    As I understand the Scientific Method, a statement purporting to be factual, either in a scientific article or in a discussion with peers, must be supported by cited evidence that may be publicly examined for its scientific veracity.

    The paper by Heeley et al provides data to illustrate the equivalence of conductivity and chloride in cystic fibrosis (CF) diagnosis,[1] and therefore corrob...

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