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Next-generation sequencing as a clinical laboratory tool for describing different microbiotas: an urgent need for future paediatric practice
  1. Richard Hansen1,
  2. Mona Bajaj-Elliott2,
  3. Georgina L Hold3,
  4. Konstantinos Gerasimidis4,
  5. Tariq H Iqbal5,
  6. Gregory Amos6,
  7. Linda V Thomas7,
  8. Julian R Marchesi8
  9. On behalf of Gut Microbiota for Health expert panel of British Society of Gastroenterology
  1. 1Department of Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Royal Hospital for Children, Glasgow, UK
  2. 2Department of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation, Institute of Child Health, University College London, London, UK
  3. 3Microbiome Research Centre, St George and Sutherland Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  4. 4Human Nutrition, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK
  5. 5Institute of Immunology and Immunotherapy, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK
  6. 6National Institute for Biological Standards and Control, Potters Bar, UK
  7. 7Gut Microbiota for Health Expert Group, British Society of Gastroenterology, London, UK
  8. 8Department of Metabolism, Digestion and Reproduction, Imperial College London, London, UK
  1. Correspondence to Dr Richard Hansen, Department of Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Royal Hospital for Children, Glasgow G514TF, UK; richard.hansen{at}glasgow.ac.uk

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We read with interest the editorial by Baralle and Ismail exploring the utility of next-generation sequencing in paediatric clinical genetics.1 The other major use of this technology, which has emerged over the last decade, is in cataloguing complex microbial communities, for instance the different human microbiomes. The microbiome describes the diverse range of microorganisms found in and on the human body and their complex interaction network. It is generally considered as comprising viruses, bacteria, archaea and fungi. The human gut contains the most complex microbial ecosystem and has been most extensively investigated to date, particularly the gut bacterial microbiota.

Briefly, two main approaches are used to identify and describe bacterial communities using next-generation sequencing: amplicon sequencing (metataxonomics) and metagenomics.2 Amplicon sequencing relies on PCR amplification of …

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Footnotes

  • Twitter @PaedsRH

  • Collaborators Gut Microbiota for Health expert panel of British Society of Gastroenterology.

  • Contributors All authors contributed equally.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests RH has received consultancy fees and conference travel support from 4D Pharma and Nutricia. GLH has received consultancy fees and conference travel support from Ferring and Proctor & Gamble. GLH is also a member of Enterobiotix scientific advisory panel. KG has received research grants, speaker’s and consultancy fees from Nestle Health Science, Nutricia-Danone, Mylan, Abbott and Baxter. THI has received speaker’s fees from Vifor, Pharmacosmosos, Shield, Takeda, Roche and Ferring. JRM has received consultancy fees from Enterobiotix.

  • Patient consent for publication Not required.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; internally peer reviewed.

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