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Respiratory hospital admissions and emergency department visits in young people with cerebral palsy: 5-year follow-up
  1. Amanda Marie Blackmore1,2,
  2. Natasha Bear3,
  3. Katherine Langdon4,
  4. Lisa Moshovis5,
  5. Noula Gibson1,3,
  6. Andrew Wilson2,6,7
  1. 1 Research and Development, Ability Centre, Mount Lawley, Western Australia, Australia
  2. 2 Telethon Kids Institute, Nedlands, Western Australia, Australia
  3. 3 Physiotherapy, Perth Children’s Hospital, Nedlands, Western Australia, Australia
  4. 4 Paediatric Rehabilitation, Perth Children’s Hospital, Nedlands, Western Australia, Australia
  5. 5 Therapy Services, Ability Centre, Mount Lawley, Western Australia, Australia
  6. 6 Respiratory Medicine, Perth Children’s Hospital, Nedlands, Western Australia, Australia
  7. 7 School of Paediatrics and Child Health, University of Western Australia, Crawley, Western Australia, Australia
  1. Correspondence to Dr Amanda Marie Blackmore, Research and Development, Ability Centre, Mount Lawley, Western Australia 6929, Australia; marie.blackmore{at}abilitycentre.com.au

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Respiratory disease accounts for a high proportion of hospital admissions in young people with cerebral palsy (CP),1 and re-admission rates are high.2 The development of respiratory disease in this population is poorly understood, but onset appears to be gradual and undetected for a long time. Early identification of risk factors for severe respiratory disease would enable families and clinicians to intervene earlier and prevent, or at least minimise, the development of severe respiratory disease.

We recently reported a 3-year longitudinal study of 482 young people (aged 1–26 years) with CP.3 At the beginning of the study, participants or their carers reported on a range of respiratory symptoms and comorbidities. These responses were linked prospectively to hospital admissions for 3 years to identify the following factors, which predicted subsequent respiratory hospital admissions: a Gross Motor Function Classification Scale (GMFCS) level V, at least one respiratory hospital admission in the year preceding the survey, oropharyngeal dysphagia, seizures, frequent respiratory symptoms, gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, at …

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Footnotes

  • Contributors Each author listed on the manuscript has seen and approved the submission of this version of the manuscript and takes full responsibility for the manuscript. The ICMJE’s recommendations were used to decide whether each person fulfilled the requirements for authorship. AMB: conception and design of the work, analysis and interpretation of data for the work and drafting the work and revising it critically for important intellectual content. NB: analysis and interpretation of data for the work and drafting the work and revising it critically for important intellectual content. KL: interpretation of data for the work and revising it critically for important intellectual content. LM: conception and design of the work, interpretation of data for the work and revising it critically for important intellectual content. NG: interpretation of data for the work and revising it critically for important intellectual content. AW: conception and design of the work, interpretation of data for the work and revising it critically for important intellectual content.

  • Funding The initial survey was funded by Health Networks Funding from the Western Australian Health Department. Analysis of the linked data was funded by individual donations to the Ability Centre and by Non-Government Centre Support.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Ethics approval Government of Western Australia, Department of Health Human Research Ethics Committee Project 2011/24, Government of Western Australia, Department of Health, Child and Adolescent Health Service Human Research Ethics Committee Registration number 1894EP, Government of Western Australia, Department of Health, Clinical Excellence Research Development Unit PRN: RGS0000002720.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; internally peer reviewed.

  • Patient consent for publication Not required.

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