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Palivizumab for children with Down syndrome: is the time right for a universal recommendation?
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  • Published on:
    Palivizumab for children with Down syndrome: is the time right for a universal recommendation?
    • Bosco Paes, Neonatologist McMaster University
    • Other Contributors:
      • Souvik Mitra, Neonatologist

    We thank Drs Bok et al. for their comments on our recent editorial about the use of palivizumab in children with Down syndrome (DS).[1] However, most of their arguments are not pertinent to DS. First, they describe the general incidence of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in children aged <5years. Second, they discuss the efficacy of palivizumab based on the IMpact trial [2] that did not include children with DS. We provided concrete evidence from [3] metanalyses conducted in 1.1 million children with DS, that the risk of RSV-related hospitalisation (RSVH) is 6.1–8.7- fold higher than children without DS.1 Drs Bok et al. also fail to appreciate that the overall relative risk of RSVH without palivizumab, is 5.5-fold (95% CI 3.97 to 7.7) higher based on robust, high quality evidence.[3] In our previous study we also reported that for every 1000 children with DS with RSV there will be 200 more (95% CI,131-297) hospitalisations compared with 1000 children without DS with RSV (RR, 5.53; 95% CI,3.97-7.73; high GRADE).[4] Moreover, Drs Bok et al. have extrapolated the number needed to treat (NNT) with prophylaxis to prevent one RSVH in children with DS using sub-optimal data. In a prospective case-control, cohort study conducted in the Netherlands and Canada, the estimated NNT in children with DS, adjusted for confounding variables, is 12 and not 20.[5] This number also aligns with the report from the CARESS registry [6] and compares favourably with the NNT of 16 for preter...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    BP has received an investigator-initiated research grant from AbbVie Corporation and compensation as an advisor and speaker for AbbVie. SM has no conflicts to declare.