Article Text

PDF
Is high-concentration oxygen therapy more effective than targeted oxygen therapy in neonatal non-tension pneumothorax?
  1. Anna Gregory1,
  2. Andrew K Ewer1,2,
  3. Anju Singh1
  1. 1 Neonatal Unit, Birmingham Women’s and Children’s NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham, UK
  2. 2 Institute of Metabolism and Systems Research, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK
  1. Correspondence to Dr Anju Singh, Neonatal Unit, Birmingham Women’s and Children’s NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham B15 2TG, UK; anjusingh{at}nhs.net

Statistics from Altmetric.com

Clinical scenario

A term newborn is admitted to the neonatal unit with positive pulse oximetry screen1 and tachypnoea. The respiratory rate is 70 breaths/min but there are no other signs of respiratory distress. The preductal pulse oximeter oxygen saturations (SpO2) are 91% and postductal SpO2 are 90% in room air. The baby is commenced on low-flow oxygen at 0.05 L/min, which improves both preductal and postductal SpO2 to 95%. Following this, the baby undergoes a chest radiograph which reveals a left-sided pneumothorax with no significant lung collapse or mediastinal shift. As this is an incidental finding and the baby shows no clinical or radiological signs of tension pneumothorax, you question the need to treat with higher concentration oxygen therapy as has previously been routine practice.

Structured clinical question

In term and late preterm neonates (≥34 weeks) with spontaneous pneumothorax (SP) without clinical or radiological signs of tension (patient), is high-concentration oxygen therapy (intervention) more effective than …

View Full Text

Request Permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.