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Risk of subsequent attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder in children with febrile seizures
  1. Yi-Chia Ku1,2,
  2. Chih-Hsin Muo3,
  3. Chin-Shein Ku4,
  4. Chao-Huei Chen1,
  5. Wen-Yuan Lee5,6,
  6. Ein-Yiao Shen2,5,
  7. Yen-Jung Chang3,7,
  8. Chia-Hung Kao6,8
  1. 1Department of Pediatrics, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan
  2. 2Graduate Institute of Acupuncture Science, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan
  3. 3Management Office for Health Data, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan
  4. 4Department of Pediatrics, National Taiwan University Hospital Yunlin Branch, Taiwan
  5. 5China Medical University Hospital Taipei Branch, Taipei, Taiwan
  6. 6Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine Science and School of Medicine, College of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan
  7. 7Department of Health Promotion and Health Education, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei, Taiwan
  8. 8Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET Center, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan
  1. Correspondence to Dr Chia-Hung Kao, Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine Science and School of Medicine, College of Medicine, China Medical University, No. 2, Yuh-Der Road, Taichung 404, Taiwan; d10040{at}mail.cmuh.org.tw

Abstract

Objective In this study, we obtained relevant data from a nationwide cohort database to investigate the risk of attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children with a history of febrile seizures (FS).

Methods We identified 1081 children with FS as the case cohort, and the date of diagnosis was used as an index date. Four controls were matched randomly with each case based on age, sex, urbanisation level, parents’ occupation, and index date. We applied Cox's proportional hazards regression to estimate the HR and CI of FS-associated ADHD.

Results After 11 years of follow-up, the incidence of ADHD for the FS and control cohorts is 7.83 and 4.72 per 1000 person-years, respectively. The FS cohort was 1.66 times more at risk of ADHD occurrence (95% CI 1.27 to 2.18) than the control cohort. The risk of developing ADHD increased in conjunction with the frequency of FS-related visits.

Conclusions FS may increase the risk of subsequent ADHD occurrence in children. Children who visited physicians for FS more than twice had a significantly higher cumulative incidence of ADHD.

  • Neurology
  • Child Psychiatry
  • Epidemiology
  • Outcomes research
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