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Images in paediatrics
Acute abdomen due to splenic torsion
  1. Simon Kargl1,
  2. Pavel Sekyra2,
  3. Wolfgang Pumberger1
  1. 1Department of Pediatric Surgery, Women's and Children's Hospital Linz, Linz, Austria
  2. 2Department of Pediatric Radiology, Women's and Children's Hospital Linz, Linz, Austria
  1. Correspondence to Dr Simon Kargl, Department of Pediatric Surgery, Women's and Children's Hospital Linz, Krankenhausstraße 26-30, Linz A-4020, Austria; kargl.simon{at}gmail.com

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A 14-year-old girl presented to our department for having collapsed after an acute episode of epigastric pain and vomiting. Past medical history was uneventful; in particular no previous abdominal complaints were mentioned. Physical examination showed a palpable tenderness in the epigastric region. Initially, gastroenteritis was suspected. Abdominal ultrasound revealed massive splenomegaly and in Doppler ultrasound splenic vein thrombosis was suspected. CT with CT angiography showed an enlarged, non-enhancing spleen with characteristic signs of splenic torsion (whirl …

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Footnotes

  • Contributors SK is responsible for the overall content of this paper as a guarantor and contributed to conception and design, writing and drafting of the manuscript. PS contributed to acquisition of data and critical revision of the manuscript. WP contributed to conception and critical revision of the manuscript.

  • Competing interests None.

  • Patient consent Obtained.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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