Article Text

PDF

Armed conflict and child health
  1. Michael Rieder1,
  2. Imti Choonara2
  1. 1University of Western Ontario, London, Canada
  2. 2Academic Division of Child Health, University of Nottingham, Derbyshire Children's Hospital, Derby, UK
  1. Correspondence to Imti Choonara, Academic Division of Child Health, University of Nottingham, Derbyshire Children's Hospital, The Medical School, Clinical Sciences Wing, Uttoxeter Road, Derby DE22 3DT, UK; imti.choonara{at}nottingham.ac.uk

Abstract

Summary Armed conflict has a major impact on child health throughout the world. One in six children worldwide lives in an area of armed conflict and civilians are more likely to die than soldiers as a result of the conflict. In stark contrast to the effect on children, the international arms trade results in huge profits for the large corporations involved in producing arms, weapons and munitions. Armed conflict is not inevitable but is an important health issue that should be prevented.

This paper is freely available online under the BMJ Journals unlocked scheme, see http://adc.bmj.com/info/unlocked.dtl

Statistics from Altmetric.com

Footnotes

  • Provenance and peer review Commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

Request Permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.