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Question 3 What is the efficacy of duct tape as a treatment for verruca vulgaris?
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  • Published on:
    Re:Don't Excise -- Exorcise

    I have updated the wikipedia entry on Duct Tape Occlusion Therapy to make it clear that Jerome Litt (MD) first published this notion of using Duct Tape to treat warts. It is likely to be further edited by others but I thought the record needed clarifying. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duct_tape_occlusion_therapy_(DTOT)_for_treating_verrucas_and_warts

    Conflict of Interest:

    None...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Re:Re:Clear duct tape based wart studies are flawed

    I find the response to Assistant Professor Samlaska to be a bit limited.

    Firstly, in the study by Wenner, they point out at the end of the paper that unbeknownst to them the clear duct tape they used had a different glue on it than regular duct tape. In fact, it had an acrylic based glue. Furthermore, the control group treatment used moleskin - this also has an acrylic based glue. So, when Wenner et al found no...

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    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Re:Don't Excise -- Exorcise

    We'd like to thank Dr Litt for informing us that he was the first to comment on this treatment method (1) and apologise for having missed this in our review (2). We would, however, add that the function of a short evidence-based review like Archimedes is to weigh the evidence for the treatment, and in particular look at when it has been subjected to trials. Harsh as it might seem, this sadly rarely includes the initial di...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Re:Clear duct tape based wart studies are flawed

    Thank you, Prof Samlaska, for your response to our article (1). It is indeed interesting the difference between traditional and clear duct tape, and this is something that we did not consider in our review. It would be worth noting however, that I think it is unlikely that the families to whom this treatment is suggested would consider this difference either.

    I agree more work should be done looking at this thera...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Clear duct tape based wart studies are flawed

    I read with much interest the article by Stubblings and Wacogne 1 on the efficacy of topical treatment for cutaneous warts with duct tape. Duct tape is a polyethylene reinforced multipurpose pressure sensitive tape with a soft and flexible shell and pressure sensitive adhesive.2 There are three layers consisting of a polyisoprene-based adhesive, a fabric reinforcement (scrim) and a polyethylene backing. Clear duct tap...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Don't Excise -- Exorcise

    Dermatologists around the world are commenting on the article published in the Archives of Diseases in Children, 2011;96(9):897-899 They are commenting specifically to me, who had written an article, published 34 years ago, in the journal Cutis, 1978;Dec; 22(6);673-6 titled "Don't Excise--Exorcise," the PubMed number for which is 720133. Look it up . . . (The Abstract is below.")

    In their Search Strategy and Outc...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.