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Daily versus as-needed inhaled corticosteroid for mild persistent asthma (The Helsinki early intervention childhood asthma study)
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  • Published on:
    Use of approriate inhaler devices for optimal delivery of inhaled corticosteroids

    We thank Dr Sonnappa and Dr Turner for their correct criticism about the use of inhaler devices for optimal delivery of inhaled corticosteroids. Concerning the present study, we would like to point out that dry powder inhalers were used for the inhaled corticosteroid and the beta-2-agonist according to the present guidelines. In order to achieve adequate teatment compliance, disodium cromoglycate was used as pressurised...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Appropriate inhaler devices for children with asthma

    Samatha Sonnappa brought out an important question about the use of appropriate inhaler devices in the treatment of asthma. In the present study in children 5-10 years of age we have solely used dry powder inhalers. The guidelines presented by Sonappa are the common recommendations in Finland as well: pressurised metered dose inhalers with spacer for children aged 0-5 years; and dry powder inhalers for children over 5 y...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Re: Use of appropriate inhaler devices for optimal delivery of inhaled corticosteroids

    Sir,

    Like Dr Sonnappa in London, I was very disappointed to see a picture on the front of this month’s Archives of a child using a pressurised metered dose inhaler (pMDI) without a spacer. This is the second such picture to appear on the front of Archives within the last 12 months and gives the wrong message to readers. The correct message is that pMDIs should not be used without a spacer device in children....

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Use of appropriate inhaler devices for optimal delivery of inhaled corticosteroids

    The BTS guidelines on the management of asthma clearly state that in children aged 0-5 years, pressurised metered dose inhaler (pMDI) with spacer is the preferred method of delivery of inhaled corticosteroids (ICS); and in children aged 5-12 years and adults, dry powder inhalers (DPI) are as effective as pMDI with spacer (Grade A evidence).(1) The cover illustration of the August issue of the Archives shows a young boy...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.