Responses

This article has a correction. Please see:

PDF
Measles vaccination and antibody response in autism spectrum disorders
Compose Response

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Author Information
First or given name, e.g. 'Peter'.
Your last, or family, name, e.g. 'MacMoody'.
Your email address, e.g. higgs-boson@gmail.com
Your role and/or occupation, e.g. 'Orthopedic Surgeon'.
Your organization or institution (if applicable), e.g. 'Royal Free Hospital'.
Statement of Competing Interests

PLEASE NOTE:

  • Responses are moderated before posting and publication is at the absolute discretion of BMJ, however they are not peer-reviewed
  • Once published, you will not have the right to remove or edit your response. Removal or editing of responses is at BMJ's absolute discretion
  • If patients could recognise themselves, or anyone else could recognise a patient from your description, please obtain the patient's written consent to publication and send them to the editorial office before submitting your response [Patient consent forms]
  • By submitting this response you are agreeing to our full [Response terms and requirements]

Vertical Tabs

Other responses

Jump to comment:

  • Published on:
    Response to article by Baird et Al

    Analysis of “Measles vaccination and antibody response in autism spectrum disorders”, Baird et Al, Arch Dis Child doi:10.1136/adc.2007.122937. Published 5th February 2008

    The report was examined and the following conclusions have been drawn from the evidence presented:

    1. The choice of participants in the study appears to have been chosen on the basis of established diagnostic criteria. However, and m...

    Show More
    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Re: Re: What does this study test, and why?

    Both John Stone and Raymond Gallup would find the answers to their questions if they actually read the study they are so quick to criticise. The authors were testing a specific hypothesis which is clearly explained. I suggest Raymond Gallup reads the detailed section concerning measles antibody tests and their results, if he does not know whether these were measured in this study. If John Stone is unclear about selection...

    Show More
    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    MMR and Autism

    On reading a report regarding the article by Gillian Baird, PhD, on the possible link between MMR and autism, I was dismayed by the conclusion. While I do not hold an opinion as to the possible link, the study's conclusions as quoted in Medscape appear unfounded. The absence of elevated levels of virus or antibody in autistic children does not disprove a link between MMR and autism. They simply show that a link between ongoin...

    Show More
    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Getting it wrong

    In a case-control study of 10 to 12-year-old children with either autism, special-educational needs, or normal development, the authors examined measles-antibody responses (plaque reduction neutralization assay) and the presence of measles virus in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction). The study apparently sought to identify autistic children relevant to the original MMR/a...

    Show More
    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Autism is a non-fatal variant of SSPE (Subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis)

    The article "Measles vaccination and antibody response in autism spectrum disorders" published in the Feb. 5, 2008 online edition of Archives of Diseases in Childhood is yet another example of the incestuous relationship between the medical profession and the vaccine manufacturers, and their collusion to avoid admitting that inoculations are causing the biggest epidemic the world has ever known; vaccine induced diseases, w...

    Show More
    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Re: What does this study test, and why?

    This study doesn't clearly say if there were blood tests done on normal subjects and subjects with autism measuring whether the subjects with autism had elevated measles antibodies.(1)

    Or if they tested to see whether subjects with autism tested positive for myelin basic protein antibodies.(2)

    Vijendra Singh did both these types of blood tests and the subjects with autism had elevated measles antibodies...

    Show More
    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    What does this study test, and why?

    Dear Editor,

    Of the original 1770 Special Educational Needs (SEN)cases in this study [1] 255 were Autistic Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Of the 1770 735 dropped out, then a further 780 were excluded for reasons which are not transparent. 255 were left (a different 255 from before): some ASD, some just SEN but we do not know in what proportion. Then, exactly 100 were excluded because of inadequate blood tests. Of the...

    Show More
    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.