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Isotonic is better than hypotonic saline for intravenous rehydration of children with gastroenteritis: a prospective randomised study
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Other responses

  • Published on:
    Is hyperchloraemic acidosis a problem in children with gastroenteritis rehydrated with normal saline
    • Kristen A Neville, Endocrinologist
    • Other Contributors:
      • Charles F Verge, Andrew R Rosenberg, Matthew W O'Meara, Jan L Walker

    Dear Editor,

    The letter from Eisenhut (1) questions the benefits of intravenous rehydration of children with gastroenteritis with Normal Saline because of the possibility of hyperchloraemic acidosis and suggests that Ringers Lactate (RL) or an equivalent solution might offer advantages over Normal Saline (NS).

    Our study of 102 children with gastroenteritis judged to need intravenous fluids, compared p...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Adverse effects of rapid isotonic saline infusion.

    Dear Editor,

    Neville et al reported on a randomized controlled trial of hypotonic versus isotonic saline for rehydration of children with gastroenteritis. They found that isotonic saline was superior with regards to correction of hyponatraemia [1]. The majority of patients in the study received a “rapid replacement protocol” which entailed the infusion of 40ml/kg of isotonic saline over 4 hours in the isotonic salin...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Intravenous fluids in hypernatraemic dehydration: the conundrum goes on.
    • Munib Haroon, Specialist Registrar Paediatrics
    • Other Contributors:
      • Sophie N Haroon.

    Dear Editor,

    We read with interest and welcomed the article by Neville et al on the use of different fluids in children with normo and hyponatraemic gastroenteritis[1] and also the Best practice article by Haycock on hypernatraemia.[2] We have recently looked at intravenous fluid use by paediatric trainees for children with hypernatraemic dehydration due to gastroenteritis, where enteral fluids cannot be administer...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Intravenous rehydration of children with gastroenteritis: which solution is better?

    Dear Editor,

    We would like to take into consideration recent publications that have recently appeared about the possibility of developing hyponatraemia in children with gastroenteritis treated with intravenous hypotonic saline and the risks derived from such complication.[1-3]

    Even though we belive these papers have been well designed and developed, we cannot agree with their results for we are carrying...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.