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Breast feeding and resilience against psychosocial stress
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  • Published on:
    Is it in the milk or in the genes: why focus on milk?

    Dear Editor,

    I would like to thank Dr Reimer for his interest in our work and reciprocate by correcting his flawed understanding of the paper. Perhaps it would be helpful to start by summarising the hypothesis, results and interpretation of the study. Our a priori hypothesis was that positive physical contact between mother and child in early life may result in enhanced control of the stress response as indicate...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Is it in the milk or in the genes?

    Dear Editor,

    This paper has in my view several serious flaws, and the conclusions does not seem well supported. The effect of reduced anxiety is so small that it seems clinically irrelevant, and is seen only in the subgroup of children having experienced divorce. Anxiety is a hereditary trait, but adjustment has only been made for very serious mental illness (not just anxiety) in the mother, and no adjustment wa...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Breast feeding, resilience against psychosocial stress, and polyunsaturated fatty acids

    Dear Editor,

    The observation that breast feeding is associated with resilience against the psychosocial stress linked with parental divorce/separation is interesting and suggests that breast milk could contain nutrients or molecules that influence neurotransmitter function in the brain. I propose that polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) present in human breast milk is responsible for this beneficial action.

    ...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.