Article Text

Download PDFPDF

RSV testing in bronchiolitis: which nasal sampling method is best?
  1. P Macfarlane1,
  2. J Denham2,
  3. J Assous1,
  4. C Hughes3
  1. 1Department of Child Health, Rotherham General Hospital, UK
  2. 2Department of Children’s Nursing, Rotherham General Hospital, UK
  3. 3Department of Microbiology, Rotherham General Hospital, UK
  1. Correspondence to:
    Dr P Macfarlane
    Department of Child Health, Rotherham General Hospital, Moorgate Road, Rotherham S60 2UD, UK; peter.macfarlanerothgen.nhs.uk

Abstract

Lower nasal swab and higher nasopharyngeal aspirate samples were compared for RSV immunofluorescence and pain score in infants hospitalised with acute bronchiolitis. The nasal swab procedure was significantly less painful but was negative in approximately one third of RSV positive cases.

  • NPA, nasopharyngeal aspirate
  • NS, nasal swab
  • RSV, respiratory syncytial virus
  • respiratory syncytial virus
  • bronchiolitis
View Full Text

Statistics from Altmetric.com

Footnotes

  • Competing interests: none declared

Request Permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.