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Medical training in the UK
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  • Published on:
    Authors response

    Dear Editor

    It is encouraging that the Royal College supports the notion that "the general paediatrician remains core to the resuscitation and stabilisation of the critically ill child" and "exposure to critically ill patients is an essential part of training", and I am glad they seek to challenge the solutions proposed. However, to dismiss them as simply unrealistic fails to heed their own goal of more imaginative...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Changes in education - stimulation, rather than simulation
    • Kentigern Thorburn, Consultant in Paediatric Intensive Care
    • Other Contributors:
      • Andrew Durward, London, UK; Ian Michelow, Boston, USA; Beyers Oosthuizen, Cape Town, South Africa; Kevin Roman, Toronto, Canada

    Dear Editor

    Dr Stewart in his leading article, “Medical training in the UK”, rightly expressed concern regarding postgraduate specialist training in paediatrics in the UK.[1] He highlights diminishing duration of training and stagnation in educational methods (dare we interpose educationalists’ mindset) as major aetiologies for looming deficiencies. Having benefited from a well-rounded formulated paediatric spec...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Medical Training in the UK
    • Patricia A Hamilton, Vice President Training & Assessment
    • Other Contributors:
      • Mary E. McGraw, The Officer for Higher Specialist Training

    Dear Editor

    Re: Medical Training in the UK

    We read the article by Dr Stewart with interest.[1] Whilst we support Dr Stewart’s statements “the general paediatrician remains core to the resuscitation and stabilisation of the critically ill child” and “exposure to critically ill patients is an essential part of training”, we wish to challenge his solutions.

    The apprenticeship concept is diffic...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Re-focussing training

    Dear Editor

    The reflections of Stewart on the state of training for general paediatricians in the acute stabilization of critically ill children will hopefully fuel much needed debate and change. Whilst agreeing with the many shortfalls of the current system which he identifies, however, I believe that the solution should not be focussed around the paediatric intensive care unit (PICU).

    The majority of r...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Training the trainees

    Dear Editor

    As a junior doctor in training, I can’t agree more strongly with Dr Stewart.[1] I am presently a senior house officer in Paediatric Intensive care and I feel strongly that all junior doctors should have an opportunity to work in an Intensive care unit. This is regardless of whether they view themselves as intensivists or general paediatricians in the long run.

    In my opinion training course...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Author's reply to Winrow

    Dear Editor

    My thanks to Dr Winrow for pointing out that all disciplines are affected by the contraction of training time.[1] Consultants all over the country are struggling to maintain the standards of care for the future in the face of increasing demands on their own time and reduced time in which to train.

    However, rather than obscure the wider issue I hope to draw attention to it. This issue affect...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    The problem is greater than PICU training

    Dear Editor

    Whilst I agree with much of what Stewart discusses, his leading article is at danger of obscuring a wider malaise in training by its call for all trainees to experience and, by extension, staff regional PICUs.[1] Potentially every specialty within Paediatrics could add its voice in this way resulting in the compartmentalisation of training.

    Consultants working in district general hospitals recogn...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.