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An audit of RCP guidelines on DMSA scanning after urinary tract infection
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  • Published on:
    Urinary tract infection and DMSA scan....again!

    Dear Editor

    The role of dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) scans following urinary tract infections (UTI) has been a matter of debate. A recent study suggested restriction of DMSA scans to patients under 1 year of age and hospitalised patients only.[1] We recently conducted a study of the DMSA scans performed in children (age 0-6 years) in this hospital from January 2000 until August 2001. Two hundred and eleven child...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    DMSAs after UTI - scan more children, not less

    Dear Editor,

    Deshpande and Verrier Jones have recently concluded that it is not worth undertaking dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) scans in children over 1 year of age who present with a "simple" urinary tract infection (UTI).[1] Their argument has three strands. First, they interpret their data as indicating a very low chance of children over 1 year having a renal scar, especially if the UTI is diagnosed by a gener...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Audit of DMSA in UTI
    Dear Editor,

    I read the recent report of an audit of DMSA scans after UTI [1] with interest, having recently completed an audit of rates of investigation locally. However the title was a little misleading, it might more accurately have been called an audit of DMSA scanning after a positive urine culture.

    The definition of UTI used for this audit was a culture of >105 organisms per ml of urine collected by...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Effectiveness in DMSA scan of children with UTI
    Dear Editor

    I read with great interest "An audit of RCP guidelines on DMSA scanning after UTI 1". I have recently presented a similar audit at Furness General Hospital, Barrow-in-Furness (29th March,2001), looking at DMSA scan in children with UTI. 75 children between the age group of 0-7 years who had DMSA scan, between 1st January to 31st December 2000 were included in my audit. The exclusion criteria were similar to the p...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.