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Effect of oral glucocorticoid treatment on serum inflammatory markers in acute asthma
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  • Published on:
    Treatment of pediatric asthma is controversial
    Dear Editor:

    The treatment of childhood asthma is controversial: although oral glucocorticoid treatment in children with asthma was associated with clinical improvement.[1] There are concerns about corticosteroids, since stopping drug treatment in children with asthma results in clinical deterioration,[2] or in the return of bronchial hyperresponsiveness within two weeks,[3] with the obvious conclusion that the nat...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Re: Oral steroids and inflammatory markers in asthma

    Dear Editor,

    We thank Dr Grigg for his interest in our work.[1] We agree that the asthma attacks may have resolved spontaneously in some cases, which was precisely why we stated that the markers fell in association with steroid therapy, and nowhere implied causality. Nevertheless, the statistical analysis suggests that the chances this occurred at random are extremely low.

    We agree that corticosteroid...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Oral steroids and inflammatory markers in asthma
    Dear Editor:

    Although the paper of El-Radhi et al[1] presents interesting data about decreases in inflammatory markers during the resolution of acute asthma, some of their conclusions are not valid. First, acute asthma has a tendency to resolve without corticosteroid therapy.[2] Since all of the children with acute asthma (quite rightly) received steroids, the observed effect may equally reflect processes associated wit...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.