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473 Validity of the ages and stages questionnaire for detecting later below average cognitive function
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  1. Andrea Bowe1,
  2. Jonathan Hourihane2,
  3. Anthony Staines3,
  4. Deirdre Murray4
  1. 1INFANT Research Centre, Paediatric Academic Unit, Cork University Hospital, Wilton, Cork, Ireland
  2. 2INFANT Research Centre, Cork, Ireland; Paediatrics, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin, Ireland
  3. 3School of Nursing, Psychotherapy and Community Health, Dublin City University, Dublin, Ireland
  4. 4INFANT Research Centre, Cork, Ireland; Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, Cork University Maternity Hospital, Wilton, Cork, Ireland

Abstract

The first 1000 days of life are a period of unique sensitivity and plasticity during which critical cognitive abilities are formed. Routine developmental screening tools aim to identify infants who would benefit from early intervention. While these tools have been validated for detecting children with more severe neurodevelopmental disorders, their ability to identify the larger proportion with below average cognitive function has not been sufficiently explored. The aim of this study was to examine the validity of the Ages and Stages Questionnaire (ASQ), for identifying children with later below average cognitive function.

The study population (n=8260) is formed from two national cohort studies, the Growing Up in Ireland (GUI) Infant cohort (n=7,444) and the Cork BASELINE cohort (n=816). The ASQ was completed at 8 months and 24-27 months respectively. Cognitive assessments were performed at age 5. Those scoring <1 standard deviation (SD) below the mean were categorised as below average cognitive function. Applying the currently used onward referral criterion (one fail in any domain) the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of the 8- and 24-27- month ASQ for detecting children with later below average cognitive function were calculated.

In the GUI cohort n=905 participants (12.5%) had scores <1SD below the mean on the Picture Similarities Scale. In the BASELINE cohort n=101 participants (13.4%) had an IQ <1SD below the cohort mean. Applying the currently used onward referral criterion (failing in any one domain in the ASQ), the sensitivity of the 8-month ASQ for detecting children scoring <1SD below the mean on the Picture Similarities Scale at age 5 was 16.4% (95% CI 14.0-19.0). The specificity was 92.0% (95% CI 91.3-92.6), with a positive predictive value (PPV) of 22.6% (95% CI 19.5-26.0) and a negative predictive value (NPV) of 88.5% (95% CI 87.7%-89.2%).

In the BASELINE cohort n=468 participants completed the 24-month ASQ and n=316 the 27-month ASQ. Applying the same onward referral criterion to the 24- and 27- month ASQ combined, the sensitivity for detecting those with an IQ <1SD below the cohort mean was 20.8% (95% CI 13.6-30.2) and the specificity was 91.1% (95% CI 88.6-93.2).

The ASQ has a low sensitivity for identifying children with below average cognitive function at age 5. The findings of this study suggest that if we are to intervene early in the developmental trajectory for children with below average cognitive function alternative methods of identifying high risk infants are needed.

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