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Hospital youth workers for violence reduction
  1. Hannah Jacob1,
  2. Charles Travers2,
  3. Gayle Hann3
  1. 1 Department of Paediatrics, North Middlesex University Hospital NHS Trust, London, UK
  2. 2 University College London Medical School, London, UK
  3. 3 Emergency Department, North Middlesex University Hospital NHS Trust, London, UK
  1. Correspondence to Dr Hannah Jacob, Department of Paediatrics, North Middlesex University Hospital NHS Trust, London N18 1QX, UK; hannahjacob{at}nhs.net

Abstract

Introduction Youth workers (YWs) can engage young people following hospital attendances with violence-related injuries. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of YWs in an urban district hospital and to explore the views of the young people engaged.

Methods Everyone referred to the hospital YWs during the 31-month study period was included and demographic data were collected. Those who engaged completed emotional disturbance, risk of criminality and feedback questionnaires.

Results There were 496 young people referred during the study period with a mean age of 14. 9 years (range 7–26). Of these, 85 (17%) engaged with YWs and 15/85 (18%) completed the programme. Most (14/15, 93%) showed reduced or no change in their criminality and emotional disturbance scores. Young people liked having credible, accessible mentors and learning effective coping strategies.

Discussion YWs based in a district hospital’s emergency department can work effectively with vulnerable young people, and this is well received by young people.

  • accident & emergency
  • adolescent health
  • general paediatrics

Data availability statement

Data are available upon reasonable request. Deidentified participant data is available upon reasonable request from the corresponding author.

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Data availability statement

Data are available upon reasonable request. Deidentified participant data is available upon reasonable request from the corresponding author.

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Footnotes

  • Twitter @HannahCJacob

  • Contributors CT did the data collection and initial analysis. HJ performed further analysis and prepared the manuscript for submission. GH conceived of the project and provided supervision throughout.

  • Funding HJ received funding from the Michelle Zalkin Scholarship through the UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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