Article Text

Download PDFPDF

Highlights from this issue
Free
  1. Nick Brown, Editor in Chief
  1. 1 Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden
  2. 2 Department of Paediatrics, Länssjukhuset Gävle-Sandviken, Gävle, Sweden
  3. 3 Department of Child Health, Aga Khan University, Karachi, Pakistan
  1. Correspondence to Dr Nick Brown, Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), Uppsala University, Uppsala 752 36, Sweden; nickjwbrown{at}gmail.com

Statistics from Altmetric.com

It wasn’t until the early 1800s that children’s rights were societally acknowledged with the enactment of laws preventing child labour. The next milestone was the creation by the League of Nations of a committee for the protection of children. Soon after followed the Geneva declaration, the first international treaty on children’s rights. Some decades later, in 1953, Unicef was founded and gathered momentum on the basis of a yaws eradication campaign before launching the Declaration on the rights of children (1959) followed by the most widely cited article of them all, the 1989 convention. So, humankind has come some way but, the pieces I have selected show how far we still have to go.

Folic acid

There a few issues in public health with as complex a background as folic acid supplementation. The 1991 Medical Research Council trial showed, convincingly, that supplementation reduces the incidence of neural tube defects. Uptake is patchy. Unlike some 80 other countries in which fortification of flour is recommended it is not mandatory in the UK. In a dissection of …

View Full Text

Request Permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.

Linked Articles