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Pamidronate administration may result in anaemia in children with osteogenesis imperfecta
  1. Izabela Michałus1,
  2. Zuzanna Nowicka2,
  3. Wiktoria Aleksandra Pietras3,
  4. Maja Nowicka4,
  5. Elżbieta Jakubowska-Pietkiewicz1
  1. 1 Department of Paediatrics, Neonates Pathology and Bone Metabolic Diseases, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland
  2. 2 Department of Biostatistics and Translational Medicine, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland
  3. 3 Student’s Scientific Association, Department of Pediatrics, Neonates Pathology and Bone Metabolic Diseases, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland
  4. 4 Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland
  1. Correspondence to Dr Izabela Michałus, Department of Pediatrics, Neonates Pathology and Bone Metabolic Diseases, Medical University of Lodz, 36/50 Sporna Street, 91-738, Lodz, Poland; izabela.michalus{at}gmail.com

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Bisphosphonates are regarded as standard of care for severe forms of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI).1 Intravenous administration is well tolerated and short-term adverse effects are mild; however, more severe reactions were occasionally reported.2 Although anaemia is a known side effect of intravenous bisphosphonates in adults,3 it has not been reported in children with OI. Here, we investigated blood parameters changes in patients with OI treated with intravenous pamidronate.

In this retrospective study, we included children with OI treated in our site over April 2014–May 2018 period. Eligible patients had at least one treatment cycle with complete blood morphology data from before the first dose and >12 hours after last infusion. Pamidronate was administered according to the ‘standard protocol’2; it was diluted in 50 or 100 mL of 0.9% sodium chloride and administrated …

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Footnotes

  • Contributors Study design: IM, ZN, WAP and MN. Data collection: IM, EJ-P, ZN, WAP and MN. Data analysis: ZN. Data interpretation: IM and ZN. Drafting manuscript: IM, ZN, WAP and MN. Revising manuscript content: IM, ZN, WAP, MN and EJ-P. Approval final version of manuscript: IM, ZN, WAP, MN and EJ-P. ZN takes responsibility for the integrity of the data analysis.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; internally peer reviewed.

  • Patient consent for publication Not required.

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