Responses

PDF
Economic cost of congenital CMV in the UK
Compose Response

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Author Information
First or given name, e.g. 'Peter'.
Your last, or family, name, e.g. 'MacMoody'.
Your email address, e.g. higgs-boson@gmail.com
Your role and/or occupation, e.g. 'Orthopedic Surgeon'.
Your organization or institution (if applicable), e.g. 'Royal Free Hospital'.
Statement of Competing Interests

PLEASE NOTE:

  • Responses are moderated before posting and publication is at the absolute discretion of BMJ, however they are not peer-reviewed
  • Once published, you will not have the right to remove or edit your response. Removal or editing of responses is at BMJ's absolute discretion
  • If patients could recognise themselves, or anyone else could recognise a patient from your description, please obtain the patient's written consent to publication and send them to the editorial office before submitting your response [Patient consent forms]
  • By submitting this response you are agreeing to our full [Response terms and requirements]

Vertical Tabs

Other responses

Jump to comment:

  • Published on:
    Response to Grosse and Lanzieri's comment on "Economic cost of congenital CMV in the UK"
    • Jenny Retzler, Lecturer in Developmental Psychology University of Huddersfield
    • Other Contributors:
      • Nick Hex, Associate Director
      • Chris Bartlett, Research Consultant
      • Anne Webb, Associate Research Consultant
      • Sharon Wood, Project Manager
      • Caroline Star, Chair
      • Paul Griffiths, Professor of Virology
      • Christine E Jones, Associate Professor in Paediatric Infectious Diseases and Immunology

    The response to our article was received with interest. Grosse and Lanzieri raise important points in connection with our recent paper [1], noting concerns that the paper overestimates the financial cost burden associated with congenital cytomegalovirus (cCMV). These points are contingent on our estimate that at least 50% total costs associated with cCMV stemmed from the cost of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) among individuals with cCMV.

    First, Grosse and Lanzieri point out that an association between cCMV and ASD has not been conclusively established, citing a systematic review and meta-analysis by Maeyama et al. (2017) [2]. We agree that there is uncertainty over this association and the prevalence estimates used (along with many of the other estimates), and have emphasised throughout our article that (i) the model is limited by the validity of the inputs, and (ii) more research is required to fully understand the epidemiology, aetiology and prognosis of cCMV. Indeed, Maeyama et al. (2017) [2] report a significant association between cCMV and ASD, but caution that these calculations are seriously limited by the infrequent number of events in the included studies. As we do, they stress the need for further research to clarify this issue.

    Second, Grosse and Lanzieri suggest that the prevalence calculation of ASD attributable to cCMV should have been calculated as the proportion of cCMV individuals with ASD minus the proportion of non-cCMV individuals with AS...

    Show More
    Conflict of Interest:
    This work was funded by the charity CMV Action.
  • Published on:
    Comment on “Economic cost of congenital CMV in the UK” by Retzler et al.
    • Scott D Grosse, health economist Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
    • Other Contributors:
      • Tatiana M Lanzieri, medical epidemiologist

    Retzler et al. report estimates of the economic cost of congenital cytomegalovirus (cCMV) in the United Kingdom.1 The projected costs of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) among persons with cCMV accounted for at least 50% of the total costs attributed to cCMV. However, an association between cCMV and ASD has not been conclusively established,2 and, in their analysis, Retzler et al. did not take into account the cost of ASD among children without cCMV.

    Retzler et al. used published ASD prevalence estimates from a Dutch study of >30,000 children screened for cCMV at 6 years of age using stored dried blood specimens, of whom 133 were CMV-positive. Of 26 children classified with symptomatic cCMV, 2 (7.7%) had ASD, as did 2/107 (1.9%) with asymptomatic cCMV.3 Retzler et al. assumed 11% of children with cCMV are symptomatic, which implies a weighted average ASD prevalence of 2.5% among children with cCMV. Five of 274 (1.8%) matched children without cCMV in the Dutch study also had ASD. If ASD were causally associated with cCMV, which has not been shown, the cost of ASD attributable to cCMV would be the cost difference of ASD among children with and without cCMV. Therefore, the projected cost of cCMV has been overestimated. Moreover, if the reported association of cCMV with ASD turns out to be non-causal, the total cost of cCMV could be half that estimated by Retzler et al.

    References
    1. Retzler J, Hex N, Bartlett C, et al. Economic cost of congenital CMV...

    Show More
    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.