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Highlights from this issue
  1. Nick Brown, Editor in Chief1,2,3
  1. 1 Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden
  2. 2 Department of Paediatrics, Länssjukhuset Gävle-Sandviken, Gävle, Sweden
  3. 3 Department of Child Health, Aga Khan University, Karachi, Pakistan
  1. Correspondence to Dr Nick Brown, Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), Uppsala University, Uppsala 75237, Sweden; nickjwbrown{at}gmail.com

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Pragmatism

Pragmatism is generally taken to mean ‘practical’, a means of operation which is both user and subject friendly. We are all bound to an extent by pragmatism as this defines the world we inhabit, simultaneously adhering to certain rules (or etiquette) of engagement and execution. So what defines a ‘pragmatic study’? I’d argue that this is a pleasingly flexible term, the common denominator being it is neither unwieldy nor unpalatable and, probably, inexpensive. By dint of these qualities a practice becomes sustainable, a feature common to this month’s choices.

Global child health

Acute gastroenteritis

Pouletty and colleagues compared detection rates of antibiotic treatable forms of diarrhoea in children returning from the tropics to France with standard culture and multiplex PCR. Though numbers were small, detection was not only faster (results on the same day) but the PCR more sensitive both in terms of identifying co-infection and illness requiring specific treatment. Though the vast majority of cases of gastroenteritis require only supportive treatment, those …

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