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Congenital Zika infection: neurology can occur without microcephaly
  1. Taíssa Ferreira Cardoso jr1,
  2. Rosana Silva dos Santos2,
  3. Raquel Miranda Corrêa3,
  4. Juliana Vieira Campos1,
  5. Ricardo de Bastos Silva4,
  6. Christine Castinheiras Tobias3,
  7. Arnaldo Prata-Barbosa5,
  8. Antonio José Ledo Alves da Cunha5,
  9. Halina Cidrini Ferreira2
  1. 1 Postgraduate Program in Perinatal Health Care, Maternidade Escola, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
  2. 2 Department of Physical Therapy, School of Medicine, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ) and Program in Perinatal Health Care, Maternidade Escola, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
  3. 3 Maternidade Escola, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
  4. 4 Physical Therapy Course, School of Medicine, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
  5. 5 Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ) and D’Or Institute for Research & Education (IDOR), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
  1. Correspondence to Professor Halina Cidrini Ferreira, Department of Physical Therapy, School of Medicine, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ 21941-913, Brazil; halinacidrini{at}me.ufrj.br

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The fetal repercussions of Zika virus (ZIKV) infection during pregnancy is of interest for maternal and child health.1 Studies on the psychomotor and neurodevelopment of children exposed in utero to arboviruses, especially non-microcephalic children, are lacking. At a maternity university hospital in Brazil, we started following the development of children, without microcephaly, born to mothers infected with ZIKV during pregnancy, searching for early warning signs of abnormalities. A normal head circumference for term newborns was defined, according to the 2016 WHO recommendation, as higher than 31.9 cm for boys and higher than 31.5 cm for girls.2 We used the Alberta Infant Motor Scale for the evaluation of motor development, and the Denver II test for tracking development in personal/social, fine motor/adaptive, language …

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Footnotes

  • Contributors HCF, RdSdS and AJLAdC conceived, designed and supervised the study. TFC, RMC, JVC, CCT and RdBS undertook recruitment of patients and data collection. AP-B provided statistical advice on study design, and all authors analysed the data. TFC and HCF drafted the manuscript, and all authors contributed substantially to its revision. HCF takes responsibility for the paper as a whole.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent Not required.

  • Ethics approval The study was approved by the Institutional Review Board of Maternidade Escola da UFRJ, and D’Or Institute for Research & Education, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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