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Individualised advance care planning in children with life-limiting conditions
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  • Published on:
    Antenatal ACP - the document that allowed us to be parents, not doctors.

    Thank you to the authors for bringing the concept of ACPs and their importance to the forefront for consideration in practice. Thankfully, I have never had to utilise one in my professional practice, but having recently been encouraged to use an antenatal ACP for our daughter, I would offer personal support to the intentions that they should be used in practice, when appropriate. Our daughter was given a terminal diagnosis antenatally, and the decisions that followed to prepare for her birth and her death would have been overwhelming and emotionally charged in the immediate aftermath and I can only assume that our journey would have looked very different without one. Instead, the decisions and plans were considered, they were controlled and they were based on our true wishes for our daughter and our family. As the authors relate too in their article, without the ACP there would have been significant likelihood that the decisions we made for our daughter would have been made ad-hoc, under emotional pressure, and the outcome of her peaceful and comfortable death, surrounded by her family and in our arms, would likely have not been as achievable. Furthermore, the authors comment that it guides healthcare providers and parents, in a structured manner to ensure needs and wishes are met and I could not agree more. I think much of the conversations that took place, would have taken place without the ACP document, but the concept as a whole encouraged timely discussions, e...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.