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Why do babies cry?
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  • Published on:
    Big boys do cry....
    • Emma A Dunne, Specialist Registrar, Paediatrics National Maternity Hospital, Holles Street, Dublin 2
    • Other Contributors:
      • John FA Murphy, Professor of Neonatology

    Dear Sir,

    It is with great interest that we read ‘Why do babies cry?” in which Dr. Robert Scott-Jupp have provided a concise evaluation of the research pertaining to non-pathologic crying in infants.

    Crying is a normal variant in the day 2 newborn examination however it can pose a significant source of stress and anxiety for parents. To add to the body of evidence detailed in this article we posed the question; What proportion of babies cry during the day 2 newborn examination?

    A convenience sample of data was collected on well babies during the standard day 2 physical examination on the postnatal ward in a tertiary maternity hospital. All babies on the postnatal ward were eligible for inclusion. Gestation, birth weight, gender, mode of delivery and duration of examination were recorded. The presence or absence of crying during examination was documented. The data was analysed using SPSS .

    One hundred and fifty three babies (n=153) were included in the study. There were 82 male infants (53%) and 71 female infants (47%). Mean birth weight was 3589g (range 2590g -5160g) with a mean gestation of 39+4 (Range 36+3 - 42+1). Mean duration of examination was 7 minutes. Eighty-one babies (52.9%) delivered by spontaneous vaginal delivery, 22 (14.4%) by ventouse, 26 (16.9%) by elective caesarean section, 20 (13.1%) by emergency caesarean section and 4(2.6%) by forceps. Overall, 118 (77.1%) babies were observed to cry during the physical examination (78%...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.