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Camp-based family treatment of childhood obesity: randomised controlled trial
  1. Beate Benestad1,2,
  2. Samira Lekhal1,
  3. Milada Cvancarova Småstuen1,3,
  4. Jens Kristoffer Hertel1,
  5. Vidar Halsteinli4,5,
  6. Rønnaug Astri Ødegård5,6,
  7. Jøran Hjelmesæth1,7
  1. 1Department of Medicine, The Morbid Obesity Centre (MOC), Vestfold Hospital Trust, Tønsberg, Norway
  2. 2Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway
  3. 3Oslo and Akershus University College, Faculty of Social Sciences, Oslo, Norway
  4. 4Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway
  5. 5St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway
  6. 6Department of Laboratory Medicine, Children's and Women's Health, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway
  7. 7Department of Endocrinology, Morbid Obesity and Preventive Medicine, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway
  1. Correspondence to Dr Beate Benestad, The Morbid Obesity Centre (MOC), Department of Medicine, Vestfold Hospital Trust, P.O. Box 2168, Tønsberg 3103, Norway; beate.benestad{at}siv.no

Abstract

Objective To compare the effectiveness of a 2-year camp-based family treatment programme and an outpatient programme on obesity in two generations.

Design Pragmatic randomised controlled trial.

Setting Rehabilitation clinic, tertiary care hospital and primary care.

Patients Families with at least one child (7–12 years) and one parent with obesity.

Interventions Summer camp for 2 weeks and 4 repetition weekends or lifestyle school including 4 days family education. Behavioural techniques motivating participants to healthier lifestyle.

Main outcome measures Children: 2-year changes in body mass index (BMI) SD score (SDS). Parents: 2-year change in BMI. Main analyses: linear mixed models.

Results Ninety children (50% girls) were included. Baseline mean (SD) age was 9.7 (1.2) years, BMI 28.7 (3.9) kg/m2 and BMI SDS 3.46 (0.75). The summer-camp children had a lower adjusted estimated mean (95% CI) increase in BMI (−0.8 (−3.5 to −0.2) kg/m2), but the BMI SDS reductions did not differ significantly (−0.11 (−0.49 to 0.05)). The 2-year baseline adjusted BMI and BMI SDS did not differ significantly between summer-camp and lifestyle-school completers, BMI 29.8 (29.1 to 30.6) vs 30.7 (29.8 to 31.6) kg/m2 and BMI SDS 2.96 (2.85 to 3.08) vs 3.11 (2.97 to 3.24), respectively. The summer-camp parents had a small reduction in BMI (−0.9 (−1.8 to −0.03) vs −0.8 (−2.1 to 0.4) in the lifestyle-school group), but the within-group changes did not differ significantly (0.3 (−1.7 to 2.2)).

Conclusions A 2-year family camp-based obesity treatment programme had no significant effect on BMI SDS in children with severe obesity compared with an outpatient family-based treatment programme.

Trial registration number NCT01110096.

  • Obesity
  • Metabolic
  • RCT
  • Family-based treatment

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Footnotes

  • Contributors BB carried out the initial analyses, drafted the initial manuscript, reviewed and revised the manuscript and approved the final manuscript as submitted. SL coordinated and supervised parts of the data collection at one of the outpatient clinics, reviewed and revised the manuscript and approved the final manuscript as submitted. MCS gave advice on the statistical analyses, carried out the statistical analyses performed in Stata, reviewed and revised the manuscript and approved the final manuscript as submitted. JKH gave advice on data preparation, contributed to discussion, reviewed and revised the manuscript and approved the final manuscript as submitted. VH carried out the health economic analyses, drafted the health economic parts of the initial manuscript, reviewed and revised the manuscript and approved the final manuscript as submitted. RAØ designed the study and wrote the protocol, coordinated and supervised data collection at one of the outpatient clinics, reviewed and revised the manuscript and approved the final manuscript as submitted. JH designed the study and wrote the protocol, reviewed the initial manuscript, reviewed and revised the manuscript and approved the final manuscript as submitted. All authors approved the final manuscript as submitted and are accountable for all aspects of the work.

  • Funding Research relating to this article was funded by the Norwegian Ministry of Health and Care Services, the Norwegian Foundation for Health and Rehabilitation and GjensidigeStiftelsen. BB has been funded by a public research grant from the South-Eastern Norway Regional Health Authority.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Ethics approval The Regional Committee for Medical and Health Research Ethics; South-Eastern Norway (2009/176).

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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