eLetters

498 e-Letters

published between 2002 and 2005

  • Urinary screening and improved prognopsis of membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis
    Hassib Narchi

    Dear Editor

    I read with interest the study by Kawasaki et al [1] in which early identification of proteinuria by school urinary screening allowed early management and improved the prognosis of for membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN). I would like to congratulate the authors for this lengthy and thorough work. The significant improvement in outcome on follow up are certainly impressive and the recomm...

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  • £750,000 investment in nothing
    Peter W Jay

    Dear Editor

    With six years experience investigating all manner of alleged serious professional misconduct cases and a further six years specialising in research misconduct allegations, primarily in the context of pharmaceutical company sponsored research, I am not in the least surprised by the conduct and outcome of this scandalous saga.

    We are seeing nothing new; innocent doctors are suspended for long peri...

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  • The author responds
    Andrew N. Williams

    Dear Editor

    I'd like to thank Dr Chakrabarti for his useful comments. The painting itself is open to a wide degree of interpretation but essentially shows a disabled child begging for a living, which was the theme of the paper. The fact that the boy is holding a begging note is suggestive of some form of speech disability but clearly we cannot know what that is. The paper itself was an attempt to what indicate wh...

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  • Reye Syndrome: an outdated notion
    Maria Casteels-Van Daele

    Dear Editor

    We would like to comment on the paper by Dr J Glasgow and Dr B Middleton on “Reye syndrome- insights on causation and prognosis” [1]. Although the authors agree that the “diagnostic criteria (of Reye syndrome) are non-specific” they ignore the logical consequences of a non- specific definition. This non-specificity implies that the epidemiological studies suggesting a link with aspirin have been performe...

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  • Response: A message for the future in a plea from the past
    S Chakrabarti
    Dear Editor,

    I am writing in response to a recent report on Ribera's 'The clubfooted boy', in which the authors coments, 'whether his disability was congenital or occurred later, affecting his speech, we can never know'.[1]

    The boy's right-sided spastic hemi paresis with 'mutism' points towards a cerebral cause and a hemiplegic cerebral palsy. He also has right-sided hemi-hypoplasia, as seen by his arm length, folde...

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  • Other infections cause hyperammonaemia
    Sam J Oddie

    Dear Editor,

    We read the report by McEwan et al[1] with great interest. We write to remind readers that marked hyperammonaemia may occur secondary to infection with a non urea splitting organism. The following case illustrates this point.

    Our patient was the first male child born to non consanguinous parents. He was delivered at 36 weeks gestation following induction of labour for possible chorioamni...

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  • Response: Community acquired pneumonia
    Harold Lambert

    Dear Editor,

    Several points in your Leading Article [1] on this topic deserve comment. While the interested reader is recommended to refer to the full guidelines in Thorax, which I gather have not yet been published, I guess that few readers of the Archives will do so, so that your Leading Article may be used as an authoritative source. Since the two crucial aspects of the treatment of pneumonia are selection o...

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  • Neurological diseases in children
    John Walker-Smith

    Dear Editor,

    I read with considerable interest the paper of Williams and Sunderland (Arch Dis Child 2001;85:506-509)concerning Thomas Willis' descriptions of neurological disease in children. I believe it would be right to describe him as a pioneer of paediatric neurology by virtue of such remarkable descriptions but I believe it is anachronistic to describe him as the first paediatric neurologist. The whole co...

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