eLetters

331 e-Letters

published between 1999 and 2002

  • Short vs. standard duration antibiotic treatment for UTIs: a comparison of two meta-analyses
    Ron Keren

    Dear Editor

    Having recently published a meta-analysis on the same clinical question,[1] it was with great interest that we read Michael et al.'s systematic review of short vs. standard duration antibiotics for urinary tract infections in children.[2] Given the publication (in close succession) of two meta-analyses on the same question with (on the surface) strikingly different results, we thought a comment was...

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  • LP and Glasgow coma score
    David Isaacs

    Dear Editor

    Congratulations to the authors on a balanced article on the need for lumbar puncture.

    One point of possible confusion is the Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) quoted as a contraindication to LP. Kneen et al. quote a GCS...

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  • Are interhospital transport teams de-skilling the DGH paediatricians?
    Andrew P Winrow

    Dear Editor

    As one of the referring hospital consultants to the South Thames combined transport service, I can attest to the successful service described in the paper by Doyle and Orr.[1] However, it is rare for a transport team to be immediately available to collect a sick child. This delay compounded by the inevitable travelling time means that the referring unit needs to be able to stabilise and treat the sick child...

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  • Cultural representation of newborn feeding
    Sergio Conti Nibali

    Dear Editor

    Recently Nicoll and Williams[1] suggest that attitudes to breast feeding need to change: "everyone (not just women) needs to see breast feeding as normal and education needs to start early". Also in Italy breastfeeding rates are low.[2] Numerous training initiatives have been set up in recent years to heighten awareness and improve healthcare practices, with the aim of promoting breastfeeding. These in...

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  • Author's reply
    Hisayoshi Kawahara

    Dear Editor

    We appreciate the interest shown by Dr Beryl Corner with regard to our article.[1] Unfortunately, intravenous atropine therapy is not widely accepted in European countries or the United States; it is however now becoming popular in Japan.

    We are truly honoured to recive the comments of Dr Corner, who is a pioneering neonatologist and reported medical treatment with methyl scopolamine nitrate for in...

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  • More lumbar punctures, please!
    Adam Finn

    Dear Editor

    Applause to Kneen et al.[1] and Riordan and Cant[2] for reminding us of the value of lumbar puncture in suspected meningitis. To their arguments I would add that, while the matter may end after seven days' intravenous antibiotic treatment as far as the admitting paediatrician is concerned, it certainly does not for the child or parents of many children who have had meningitis, as recent data shows.[3]...

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  • Re: Fluid management in diabetic ketoacidosis
    Tapabrata Chatterjee

    Dear Editor

    I read with interest "Fluid Management in Diabetic Ketoacidosis" published in June 2002.[1] I appreciate that duration of fluid therapy for correction of dehydration is of profound importance. I also feel that the issue of giving potassium in form of potassium phosphate is inadequately addressed in most of the guidelines for management of DKA in this country.

    It is almost inevitable that...

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  • Treatment with cyclosporin in a patient with Omenn’s syndrome.
    Andrew R Gennery

    Dear Editor

    We read with interest the report by Meyer-Bahlbueg and colleagues about treatment of a child with Omenn’s syndrome by cyclosporin prior to haemopoeitic stem cell transplantation. The finding of prolonged severe bronchopulmonary infection despite antibiotic treatment is strongly suggestive of viral pneumonitis and we wonder if any viral investigations were performed. Likewise, the protracted diarrhoea...

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  • Intravenous atropine treatment in infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis
    Beryl Corner

    Dear Editor

    Hypertrophic pyloric stenosis of infancy is a disorder of early infancy with typical clinical features and well-established radiological appearance of the pyloric canal. Many studies with surgical and medical treatment have been reported over the past fifty years. Pylorotomy has tended to become the favoured method of treatment as with expert paediatric, surgical, anaesthetic and nursing services...

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  • Penicillin prophylaxis for sickle cell disease
    Cristiana M Nascimento-Carvalho

    Dear Editor

    Asplenia predisposes to serious infections due to polysaccharide encapsulated organisms.[1] Young children with sickle cell disease are at risk of pneumococcal bacteremia at a rate approximating 100 times that observed in normal infants and young children.[2] In 1986, Gaston et al. reported reduced pneumococcal infection and related deaths in children with sickle cell disease given twice-dail...

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