eLetters

1458 e-Letters

  • Re: Growth monitoring
    Paul Garner
    Dear Editor

    Michael Perkin[1] is absolutely right. The initial protocol defined routine growth monitoring in the setting familiar to us in poorer countries as three monthly measurements. As we found so few studies in our first search, we extended the inclusion criteria to any trial where growth is routinely monitored twice or more in any two year period in children aged 0-5 years, but neglected to change the wording in t...

    Show More
  • Spacers and holding chambers: Not the last word, we hope
    Jolyon P Mitchell

    Dear Editor:

    Zar and colleagues[1] compared home-made spacers and two commercially available valved holding chambers (VHCs) for the treatment of children with acute asthma. We acknowledge that the practice of using empty drink bottles is common in some countries (by either necessity or choice). We, as a manufacturer of one of the VHCs that was evaluated, are highly concerned about the support to the hypothesi...

    Show More
  • Re: Sweat chloride and conductivity
    Mary Heeley
    Dear Editor

    As the principal author of the NCCLS guideline on sweat testing methodology, Dr Le Grys should be better informed of its content. It includes the clear statement that when sweat test results are obtained by conductivity measurement "the patient should be referred for quantitative sweat electrolyte testing". In our paper we refer to this statement as implying that sweat conductivity measurement should be re...

    Show More
  • Re: Tertiary paediatrics needs a disability model
    Brian Neville

    Dear Editor:

    I am grateful to Dr Waterston for his commentary. In order to clarify the issues that he raised, I will confirm the following:

    (1) I was suggesting that the practice in all branches of tertiary paediatrics should be considered as a disability service from the perspective of the family and child’s predicament. I was not confining the proposal to traditional neurodisability.

    (2)...

    Show More
  • Re: The impact of diagnostic delay on the course of acute appendicitis
    Stephen K Dotse

    Dear Editor

    The article from the Netherlands by Cappendijk and Hazebroek[1] has again confirmed what is already known in clinical practice. A recent paper from the Leicester Royal infirmary[2] is almost identical.

    As the authors pointed out, the factors determining the diagnostic delay are numerous and often cannot be influenced. However, I agree with their statement that “in a child with abdominal pai...

    Show More
  • Are sleep studies worth doing?
    Steve Cunningham

    Dear Editor:

    If sleep studeis are worth doing, they are worth doing well. The study of sleep disordered breathing is another area of paediatrics that the UK has stumbled to embrace.[1, 2] Sleep medicine has exponentially increased in adults in recent years, yet in paediatrics many questions remain unanswered.

    While, van Someren et al made a valiant attempt to answer an important question,[3] they did...

    Show More
  • Sweat chloride and conductivity
    Vicky A LeGrys
    Dear Editor

    As a principal author of the sweat testing document published by National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS) and consultant to the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation (CFF)(US), I write to address an inaccuracy in the article by Heeley et al (Indirect measurement of sweat electrolyte concentration in the laboratory diagnosis of cystic fibrosis. Arch Dis Child 2000;82:420-4). The authors misrepresent...

    Show More
  • Iron deficiency anaemia, Helicobacter pylori infection and delayed pubertal growth
    L Cuoco

    Dear Editor

    We read with great interest the paper of Choe and colleagues who investigated possible relationships between H. pylori infection with iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) and subnormal growth at puberty.[1] They concluded that H. pylori infection and related IDA, rather than bacterial infection per se, might cause delayed pubertal growth. We believe that Choe et al’s results need some considerations.

    ...

    Show More
  • Data presented do not justify pessimistic conclusions
    Charlotte M Wright
    Dear Editor

    This article tells us that over the last 30 years the US youth has shown a decrease in total energy consumed, as well as the percentage of energy from fat and in particular saturated fats. So what are the conclusions of the article? That "these trends .... may compromise the health of future US populations". In the discussion section worries are expressed about low iron and fibre intakes: despite the fact th...

    Show More
  • Growth monitoring
    David Morley
    Dear Editor

    Garner, Panpanich and Logan (Arch Dis Child 2000;82:197-201) presented a much needed review of growth monitoring. This is a component of primary health care on which so much finance and health workers' time has and is being expended. No doubt this review will stimulate more necessary trials.

    However, they did not touch on one important aspect of growth monitoring, that is whether health work...

    Show More

Pages