eLetters

534 e-Letters

published between 2003 and 2006

  • Vit D deficiecy; Preventive measure usually more cost effective.
    Dr EB Odeka FRCP FRCPCH

    Dear Editor,

    We read with interest the article by C S Zipitis, G A Markides and I L Swann regarding the cost of prevention and treatment of vitamin D deficiency [1]. We agree with the proposal that local authorities should provide funds to supplement vitamin D in ‘at risk’ ethnic minority groups.

    Similar to Burnley, Oldham has a large Asian community of 20.8%. Between December 2002 and March 2004, we i...

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  • Is hyperchloraemic acidosis a problem in children with gastroenteritis rehydrated with normal saline
    Kristen A Neville

    Dear Editor,

    The letter from Eisenhut (1) questions the benefits of intravenous rehydration of children with gastroenteritis with Normal Saline because of the possibility of hyperchloraemic acidosis and suggests that Ringers Lactate (RL) or an equivalent solution might offer advantages over Normal Saline (NS).

    Our study of 102 children with gastroenteritis judged to need intravenous fluids, compared p...

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  • Baby Friendly Initiative: is the training of doctors being ignored? - Who is ignored?
    Barbara Królak-Olejnik

    Dear Editor,

    The need to promote and support breastfeeding is unquestionable. There is strong evidence that exclusive and prolonged breastfeeding has multiple health benefits for mothers and their infants. American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and World Health Organization (WHO) recommend exclusive breastfeeding for the first 6 months of life. Both the AAP and American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACO...

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  • Monitoring tissue pH vs lactate and ATP degradation products in sepsis
    Richard G Fiddian-Green

    Dear Editor,

    In rats "impaired microcirculatory alteration in septic shock is more severe than hemorrhagic shock" (1). Endotoxin [which is used to induce septic shock in animal models and when translocating from the gut is thought to contribute to the development of septic shock in the critically ill] increases serum lactate by "inactivation of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH), unrelated to changes in tissue PO2" (2)...

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  • Tissue pH vs ATP degradation products.
    Richard G Fiddian-Green

    Dear Editor,

    In rats "impaired microcirculatory alteration in septic shock is more severe than hemorrhagic shock" (1). Endotoxin [which is used to induce septic shock in animal models and when translocating from the gut is thought to contribute to the development of septic shock in the critically ill] increases serum lactate by "inactivation of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH), unrelated to changes in tissue PO2" (2)...

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  • Parents and paediatric research : Need for a wider perspective
    Parameswaran Anoop

    Dear Editor,

    Gammelgaard et al have to be commended for their study which attempts to throw light on some of the complex issues, ethical and otherwise, surrounding parental attitudes towards research in children.(1) While agreeing broadly with the authors' conclusions regarding the feasibility of setting up a research project which conforms to parental perceptions, we would like to stress the need for viewing this i...

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  • A novel approach to patching
    Samantha A Harding

    Dear Editor,

    We were interested to read Dixon-Woods et al’s (1) work on patching and parental factors that affect compliance. A parent recently presented our eye clinic with her own novel approach to ensuring her five-year-old son with Langherhans cell histiocytosis X wore his patches (see figure 1). The child was seen as an outpatient at the local hospital for two years and had not achieved a visual acuity better...

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  • Changing faces of coeliac disease - DGH Perspective.
    Dr Egware Odeka frcp frcpch

    Dear Editor,

    The paper from Cardiff by Ravi kumara et al and the comprehensive summary by Beattie is timely and to a great extent serve to remind professionals who deal with patients with Coeliac disease(CD) of the current thinking on this subject. In my experience in caring for patients with gastroenterological ailments in a DGH, the spectrum of the cases I have been exposed to are clearly highlighted in these pap...

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  • Re: Orphan diseases and orphan drugs: infant botulism and BIG-IV
    Stephen Arnon

    Dear Editor,

    The Archivist’s mention in your journal (2006;91:611) of the recent success of Human Botulism Immune Globulin (BIG-IV) in the treatment of infant botulism noted that this orphan drug was available only in the United States, where it is licensed. BIG-IV demonstrated efficacy by shortening mean hospital stay by almost one month, from 5.7 weeks to 2.2 weeks. However, your contributor could not have...

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  • Teaching students Paediatric history taking and examination.
    Dr Egware Odeka FRCP FRCPCH

    Dear Editor,

    I read with interest the paper from Oxford by Craze et al(1) and agree with the general gist of the subject. As a paediatrician with interest in medical student education, I facilitate the teaching of paediatrics to the students posted to my DGH for the 6-8weeks scheduled for paediatrics and have examined on the subject. The observations in the paper from Oxford clearly reflects my experience. Over the...

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