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Off-label use of tacrolimus in children with Henoch-Schönlein purpura nephritis: a pilot study
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    Calcineurin inhibitors tacrolimus and Cyclosporine A in the treatment of Henoch- Schönlein Purpura in children
    • Matti Nuutinen, Professor Department of Children and Adolescents, Oulu University Hospital

    I read with great interest the article titled “Off-label use of tacrolimus in children with Henoch-Schönlein purpura nephritis: a pilot study” by Zhang et al.(1). To my great astonishment the authors did not discuss any of the studies published on the use of another calcineurin inhibitor Cyclosporine A (CyA)  in the treatment of Henoch Schönlein purpura in children.

    In the first chapter of the discussion section they refer to our report where we compared methylprednisolone pulse treatment (MP) and CyA in a randomized trial (2) stating that “Remission was achieved slowly and only in 53% of patients with methylprednisolone” (1).

    I would like to draw the readers´s attention to the fact that in the same paper we showed that another calcineurin inhibitor i.e. CyA was by no means inferior to MP for the treatment of severe HSN (2). Indeed, CyA was even more efficacious than MP, since remission was achieved within 3 months in all CyA-treated patients (N=11) compared to 54% (7/13) in MP group (p=0.016). All the CyA treated patients responded to the treatment with no need for additional immunosuppressive therapy. In contrast, in MP group 6/13 (46%) needed additional immunosuppressive treatment. The remission rates in the MP treated patients were 85% (11/13) and 77% (10/13) after 1 and 2 years, respectively in contrast to 100 % in CyA-treated patients. The renal survival rate in the CyA group was 100%, as against 85% in the...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.