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Medication errors by caregivers at home in neonates discharged from the neonatal intensive care unit
  1. Ritanshu Solanki1,
  2. Nivedita Mondal1,
  3. Thulasingam Mahalakshmy2,
  4. Vishnu Bhat1
  1. 1 Dept. of Neonatology, Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research, Pondicherry, India
  2. 2 Dept of P&SM, Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research, Pondicherry, India
  1. Correspondence to Dr Nivedita Mondal, Department of Pediatrics, JIPMER, Pondicherry 605006, India; nive.m8{at}gmail.com

Abstract

Objective To determine the frequency of medication errors by caregivers at home in neonates discharged from the neonatal intensive care unit and to identify the associated risk factors.

Methods A descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted in the High Risk Newborn Follow-up Clinic of our institute, on a sample of 166 children, <3 months old. The medications prescribed (syrup preparations of vitamin D, multivitamins, calcium, iron and levetiracetam, tablet L-thyroxine and ursodeoxycholic acid and human milk fortifier powder) were noted from the discharge summary. The caregiver who usually administered the medicines to the child at home was asked the names of the medications, frequency of their administration and to show in a measuring cup/syringe/dropper the dose of the medication. The names, doses and frequency of the drugs as reported were matched against those actually prescribed in the discharge summary. Various risk factors probably associated with medication errors, were noted.

Results The frequency of medication errors by caregivers in infants discharged from the neonatal intensive care unit was 66.3%. Dose administration error, that is, measurement of a dose different from what was prescribed was the most common error (54%). A prescription containing more than three drugs was found to have statistically significant association (OR 4.19, CI 1.59 to 11.07, p=0.00).

Conclusion Medication errors by caregivers in infants less than 3 months of age are very common, dose administration error being the most common type. A prescription of more than three drugs increases the odds of an error.

  • infants
  • caregivers
  • medication errors

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Footnotes

  • Contributors RS: study design, acquisition of data and drafting of manuscript. NM: study conception and design, drafting of manuscript, analysis of data and critical revision. MT: analysis of data and drafting of manuscript. BVB: study design and critical revision of manuscript. All authors approved the final manuscript.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Ethics approval Institute Ethics Committee, JIPMER, Pondicherry.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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