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Risk factors for obesity in 7 year old European children: The Auckland birthweight collaborative Study
  1. Nikki J Blair (nikki.blair{at}ccdhb.org.nz)
  1. University of Auckland, New Zealand
    1. John M D Thompson (j.thompson{at}auckland.ac.nz)
    1. University of Auckland, New Zealand
      1. Peter Black (pn.black{at}auckland.ac.nz)
      1. University of Auckland, New Zealand
        1. David Becroft (david.genevieve.becroft{at}xtra.co.nz)
        1. University of Auckland, New Zealand
          1. Phillipa Clark (p.clark{at}auckland.ac.nz)
          1. University of Auckland, New Zealand
            1. Dug Yeo Han (dy.han{at}auckland.ac.nz)
            1. University of Auckland, New Zealand
              1. Elizabeth Robinson (e.robinson{at}auckland.ac.nz)
              1. University of Auckland, New Zealand
                1. Karen Waldie (k.waldie{at}auckland.ac.nz)
                1. University of Auckland, New Zealand
                  1. Christopher Wild (c.wild{at}auckland.ac.nz)
                  1. University of Auckland, New Zealand
                    1. Edwin A Mitchell (e.mitchell{at}auckland.ac.nz)
                    1. University of Auckland, New Zealand

                      Abstract

                      Objective: To identify risk factors associated with obesity in primary school children, with a particular focus on those which can be modified. To identify critical periods and growth patterns in the development of childhood obesity.

                      Methods: 871 New Zealand European children were enrolled in a longitudinal study at birth and data collected at birth, 1, 3.5 and 7 years of age. Data collected at 7 years included weight, height, bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA), television viewing time and a 24 hour body movement record (actigraphy). The outcome measure was percentage body fat (PBF), which was calculated at 3.5 and 7 years using BIA. Univariate and multiple regression analyses were carried out using PBF as a continuous variable.

                      Results: Multivariable analysis found maternal overweight/obesity, maternal age, female gender, sedentary activity time and hours of television viewing to be independently associated with PBF at 7 years. Growth variables (birth weight, rapid weight gain in infancy, early (1 to 3.5 years) and middle childhood (3.5 to 7 years)) were also independently associated with adiposity at 7 years. There was a strong correlation between PBF at 3.5 years and PBF at 7 years.

                      Conclusions: Many primary school aged children start on the trajectory of obesity in the preschool years which suggests interventions need to start early. Maternal overweight/obesity, television watching, sedentary activity time and rapid weight gain in infancy, early and middle childhood are risk factors for childhood obesity, and are all potentially modifiable.

                      • catch up growth
                      • child, obesity
                      • percentage body fat
                      • risk factors
                      • small for gestational age

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