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O-172 Infant Feeding And Anti-tissue Transglutaminase Antibody Levels In Children With Subclinical Celiac Disease: The Generation R Study
  1. IIM Tromp1,
  2. MAE Jansen1,
  3. JC Kiefte-de Jong2,
  4. VWV Jaddoe3,
  5. A Hofman2,
  6. JC Escher4,
  7. H Hooijkaas5,
  8. HA Moll6
  1. 1Pediatrics/The Generation R Study Group, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands
  2. 2Epidemiology, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands
  3. 3The Generation R Study Group/Pediatrics/Epidemiology, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands
  4. 4Pediatric Gastroenterology, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands
  5. 5Immunology, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands
  6. 6Pediatrics, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands

Abstract

Objective To examine whether the timing of gluten introduction and breastfeeding duration are associated with subclinical celiac disease in children at the age of 6 years.

Methods This study was embedded in the Generation R study, a population-based prospective cohort study. Participants included 1679 Dutch children positive for HLA-DQ2/DQ8. Data on the timing of gluten introduction (<6 months vs. ≥6 months) and duration of breastfeeding (<6 months vs. ≥6 months) were obtained by questionnaire. Serum samples were analysed for anti-tissuetransglutaminase (tTG) levels at age 6 years. Anti-tTG levels were categorised into negative (≤7 U/ml) and positive (>7 U/ml) levels. Positive anti-tTG levels were further categorised based on the ≥10 times upper limit of normal (ULN) levels of the test kit (>7–70 U/ml and ≥70 U/ml). Multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed.

Results Positive anti-tTG levels were found in 43 children of which 26 children had levels above the 10 times ULN (≥70 IU/ml). The introduction of gluten from the age of 6 months onwards and breastfeeding for 6 months or longer were not significantly associated with positive anti-tTGlevels. In addition, the timing of gluten introduction and duration of breastfeeding were not significantly associated with positive anti-tTG levelsbelow and above the 10 times ULN.

Conclusions Delayed introduction of gluten beyond the age of 6 months does not increase the risk of subclinical CD. Also, breastfeeding for 6 months or longer does not decrease the risk of subclinical CD in children at 6 years of age.

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