Article Text

PDF

O-018 Epinephrine Versus Placebo In Hospitalised Infants With Bronchiolitis Treated With Hypertonic Saline Solution
  1. JC Flores-Gonzalez1,
  2. P Comino-Vazquez1,
  3. G Jimenez-Gómez2,
  4. P Rodriguez-Campoy1,
  5. M Matamala-Morillo1,
  6. R Garcia-Ortega1,
  7. JJ Perez-Guerrero1,
  8. L Garcia-Garcia1,
  9. FJ Dávila-Corrales1,
  10. B Serrano-Moyano1,
  11. E Palma-Zambrana1,
  12. R Bulo-Contreras3,
  13. AM Lechuga-Sancho4
  1. 1Pediatrics Department, Hospital Universitario Puerta Del Mar, Cádiz, Spain
  2. 2Research Unit, Hospital Universitario Puerta Del Mar, Cádiz, Spain
  3. 3Farmaceutics Department, Hospital Universitario Puerta Del Mar, Cádiz, Spain
  4. 4Cadiz University, Hospital Universitario Puerta Del Mar, Cádiz, Spain

Abstract

Background and aims No bronchodilator nebulised in saline has significantly proven to be more effective than saline alone. The efficacy of adrenaline in hypertonic saline solution has not yet been studied. To determine the utility of nebulised adrenaline in hypertonic saline solution to treat acute bronchiolitis in moderately ill hospitalised infants.

Methods Randomised, double-blind, controlled trial. 185 hospitalised infants (age 2.11 ± 2.23 months (mean ± SD)) with acute bronchiolitis received either nebulised 7 ml of 3% hypertonic saline solution with 3 mg of adrenaline (group SSH3%+A; n = 94) or with 3 ml of placebo (group SSH3%+P; n = 91), in addition to routine therapy. Nebulisations were initially administered every four hours and adjusted thereafter according to clinical response. Severe bronchiolitis and patients with serious risk factors were excluded. The principal outcome measure was hospital length of stay (LOS).

Results On an intention-to-treat basis, the 3%HHS+A group had a clinically relevant reduction in LOS (3.94 ± 1.88 days), compared with 4.88 ± 2.30 days in the 3%HHS+P group (p = 0.011). There were no statistically significant differences (p > 0.05) in: age (2.12 vs 2.10 months), male gender (50% vs 49%), atopic dermatitis (16.5% vs 9.6%), smoking parents (46% vs 36%), parental atopy (29% vs 31%), breastfeeding (56% vs 53%), number of siblings (0.68 vs 0.72), day care attendance (14% vs 10%), clinical scale at admission (5.24 vs 5.36) or percentage of positive RSV (60% vs 61%).

Conclusions The use of nebulised adrenaline in hypertonic saline solution may significantly reduce the length of stay among hospitalised infants with moderately ill acute bronchiolitis.

Statistics from Altmetric.com

Request permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.