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1272 Survival and Neurodevelopmental Outcome of Preterm Infants with a Gestational Age of 22 to 26 Weeks in a Regional Centre
  1. P Kutz,
  2. S Supcun-Ritzler,
  3. C Roll
  1. Department of Neonatology and Pediatric Intensive Care, Vest Children’s Hospital, University of Witten-Herdecke, Datteln, Germany

Abstract

Background and Aims Counselling parents of extremely preterm infants requires knowledge on results of large population-based cohorts and contemporaneous local data.

Methods We assessed the outcome of all live-born infants 2006 to 2009 with a gestational of 22 to 26 weeks (outborns admitted to neonatal care and all inborns). At a corrected age of 24 months infants underwent Bayley Scales of Infant and Development II testing, clinical and neurological examinations.

Results There were 105 infants < 27 weeks born alive, with a median birth weight of 675 g (range 300–1300 g), of whom 23 (22%) died before discharge; (≤22 weeks 9/10; 23 weeks 9/18; 24 weeks: 3/22; 25 weeks 1/22; 26 weeks: 1/33). Two infants died after discharge. Complete follow-up data are available in 74 (93%) of the 80 survivors. The median MDI score was 94; >84 in 44 (59%), 84–70 in 20 (27%), and < 70 in 10 (14%) infants. The median PDI score was 98; >84 in 53 (72%), 84–70 in 12 (16%), and < 70 in 9 (12%) infants. None of the children were blind or deaf, 14 had glasses, 5 required hearing aids. Overall, neurodevelopment was classified as normal in 45 of 74 (61%) infants (22 weeks: 0/1; 23 weeks: 1/7; 24 weeks: 10/17; 25 weeks: 12/19; 26 weeks: 22/30).

Conclusions The rates of overall survival (76%) and normal neurological development among survivors (61%) were similar to contemporaneous data from for Sweden (70%) and the Stockholm area (65%), respectively.

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