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Arch Dis Child 97:478-480 doi:10.1136/archdischild-2011-300691
  • Short report

Specific antibody deficiency in children with chronic wet cough

  1. Erol A Gaillard1,2
  1. 1Department of Paediatrics, University Hospitals of Leicester, Leicester, UK
  2. 2Department of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation, University of Leicester, Leicester, UK
  3. 3Department of Clinical Biochemistry and Immunology, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge, UK
  4. 4Department of Immunology, University Hospitals of Leicester, Leicester, UK
  1. Correspondence to Dr Erol A Gaillard, Department of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation, University of Leicester, PO Box 65, Robert Kilpatrick Clinical Sciences Building, Leicester Royal Infirmary, Leicester LE2 7LX, UK; eag15{at}le.ac.uk
  • Received 24 July 2011
  • Accepted 5 January 2012
  • Published Online First 30 January 2012

Abstract

The prevalence and clinical significance of specific polysaccharide antibody deficiency (SAD) in children are poorly understood. The authors sought to determine the prevalence of SAD in children with chronic wet cough, through a retrospective study of all children with chronic wet cough attending our tertiary respiratory clinic over a 12-month period. Antibody levels to 13 pneumococcal serotypes were measured following vaccination with the unconjugated pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine, Pneumovax II, and clinical data were reviewed. Twenty-four children over 2 years of age with chronic wet cough were vaccinated. Fourteen (58%) failed to mount an adequate antibody response, consistent with SAD. Children with SAD were more likely than children with normal antibody responses to require intravenous antibiotics (p=0.035) and to have abnormal chest radiographs (p=0.029). The authors conclude that SAD is present in a significant number of children with chronic wet cough. The clinical significance and long-term outcome of SAD warrant further investigation in prospective studies.

Footnotes

  • Competing interests None.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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