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INDIVIDUALIZED VERSUS STANDARDIZED PARENTERAL NUTRITION IN VERY PRETERM INFANTS: IMPACT ON SODIUM PLASMA CONCENTRATION DURING THE FIRST WEEK OF LIFE
  1. F Bonsante1,
  2. S Iacobelli1,
  3. A Vintejoux1,
  4. J B Gouyon1
  1. 1Department of Pediatrics, NICU, University Hospital, Dijon, France

Abstract

First days of life hypernatraemia (Na⩾150 mEq/L) and hyponatraemia (Na⩽130 mEq/L) occur in 10–40% of very low birth weight infants (VLBWI). Both Na disturbances have been related to long-term clinical and neurological morbidity. Few prospective studies explored short-term consequences on Na concentration of standardized parenteral nutrition (SPN), recently prescribed for VLBWI immediately after delivery. In November 2006, due to hospital’s pharmacy policy, a SPN regime was introduced for routine use in our NICU. 8 SPN formulations were designed with reference to published recommended intakes.

Objectives We aimed to compare differences in Na disturbances during first week of life in very preterm infants receiving individualized (IPN) versus SPN regimes.

Methods 51 preterm <33 weeks gestation born consecutively within 4 months before and 93 within 9 months after implementation of SPN regime were prospectively evaluated.

Results The two groups were similar for gestation and birth weight; infants in IPN had more water (p<0.05) and less sodium (p<0.01) daily intakes than infants in TPN. Hyper and hyponatraemia did not differ into groups (2.1% and 8.3% in IPN versus 5.4% and 9.8% in SPN regime) (p = ns).

Conclusions There were no significant differences in Na disturbances in very preterm infants who received IPN versus SPN.

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