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State of the world’s children and progress towards the Alma Ata Declaration
  1. B O Olusanya1,2,
  2. J K Renner3,
  3. A A Okolo4
  1. 1
    Institute of Child Health and Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Trust, University College London, London, UK
  2. 2
    Institute of Child Health and Primary Care, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Lagos, Nigeria
  3. 3
    Department of Paediatrics, College of Medicine, University of Lagos and Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Idiaraba, Surulere, Lagos, Nigeria
  4. 4
    Institute of Child Health, College of Medical Sciences, University of Benin, Benin City, Nigeria
  1. Bolajoko O Olusanya, Institute of Child Health and Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Trust, University College London, 30 Guilford Street, London WC1N 1EH, UK; b.olusanya{at}ich.ucl.ac.uk

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In an earlier report,1 one of us drew attention to the plight of the many survivors of child mortality in the developing world and the lack of relevant data on developmental disabilities in the yearly report by UNICEF on the state of the world’s children within the context of “health” as envisioned in the Alma Ata Declaration of 1978.2 It is gratifying to note for the first time that UNICEF in its latest report3 has introduced data …

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