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Maternal vitamin D status and breast milk concentrations of calcium and phosphorus
  1. M Nickkho-Amiry1,
  2. A Prentice2,
  3. F Ledi3,
  4. M A Laskey2,
  5. G Das4,
  6. J L Berry5,
  7. M Z Mughal1
  1. 1
    Department of Paediatric Medicine, Saint Mary’s Hospital for Women & Children, Manchester, UK
  2. 2
    MRC Human Nutrition Research, Cambridge, UK
  3. 3
    Trafford Primary Care Trust, Manchester, UK
  4. 4
    Central Primary Care Trust, Manchester, UK
  5. 5
    Department of Medicine, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK
  1. Dr Zulf Mughal, Department of Paediatric Medicine, Saint Mary’s Hospital for Women & Children, Hathersage Road, Manchester M13 0JH, UK; zulf.mughal{at}cmmc.nhs.uk

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Causes of rickets include vitamin D deficiency, inherited disorders of vitamin D metabolism, dietary calcium deficiency and disorders of renal re-absorption of phosphorus.1 We have recently seen cases of rickets in exclusively breastfed infants <6 months old born to vitamin D deficient mothers. This observation led us to speculate that rickets in such infants might arise in part because of low breast milk concentrations of calcium and phosphorus. Therefore, the aim of this pilot study was to compare calcium and phosphorus concentrations in the breast milk of vitamin D deficient and replete mothers.

A …

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