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Child protection and dermatology joint session

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G/THUR/CPD1 UK SURVEY OF THE MEDICAL ASSESSMENT OF CHILDREN IN WHOM THERE ARE CONCERNS REGARDING SEXUAL ABUSE

C. Hobbs, J. Price, A. Thomas.RCPCH, London, UK

Aims: To collect information about current UK practice in the medical examination of children in whom sexual abuse is suspected.

Methods: Two questionnaires were sent out to 383 named and designated doctors in child protection. The second detailed questionnaire was additionally sent to forensic medical examiners (FMEs) who examine children.

Results: With regard to colposcope use, of 249 replies from questionnaire 1, 133 had dedicated use, 32 shared use and 75 no access. 158 paediatricians, 88 FMEs and 2 others replied to questionnaire 2. 64/181 respondents indicated that the colposcope was sited in a dedicated area. Of 211 doctors who examined children, 142 made hand drawings, 199 used body plans, 11 used still film photography, 46 still digital photography and 52 videophotography. 88 photographed all findings, normal or abnormal and 36 only abnormal findings. Of 248 respondents, Paediatricians examined alone (110), FMEs examined alone (73), paediatricians and FMEs examined jointly (192), 2 paediatricians examined jointly (85), or a paediatrician examined with another doctor (mainly GUM/Gynae) (7). Sexually transmitted infections were sampled for by 192 (where specified, selective in 131, routinely for all children in 16). 129 respondents had difficulty recruiting staff to examine these children. Professional support included peer review (90), attendance at a training course (57), a trusted colleague (86) or nothing (34). Only 35 respondents indicated that SpRs were involved in seeing sexually abused children in their area.

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Abstract G/THUR/CPD1

Conclusions: Improvements in practice and service provision have slowly taken place since the last survey in 1996. This area of paediatric practice requires further strengthening by increasing staffing resources, universal training at SpR and Consultant level and enhanced support systems for medical staff.

G/THUR/CPD2 MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS IN CHILD PROTECTION: WHY DO WE DO THEM?

C. Kirk, A. Lucas-Herald, J. Mok.Royal Hospital for Sick Children, Edinburgh, UK

Introduction: Child protection …

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