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Low calcium intake and hypovitaminosis D in adolescent girls
  1. A Khadilkar1,
  2. G Das2,
  3. M Sayyad3,
  4. N Sanwalka4,
  5. D Bhandari4,
  6. V Khadilkar5,
  7. M Z Mughal6
  1. 1
    Hirabai Cowasji Jehangir Medical Research Institute, Jehangir Hospital, Pune, India
  2. 2
    Central Manchester Primary Care Trust, Manchester, UK
  3. 3
    Abeda Inamdar Senior College, Pune, India
  4. 4
    Interdisciplinary School of Health Science, Pune University, Pune, India
  5. 5
    Hirabai Cowasji Jehangir Medical Research Institute, Jehangir Hospital, Pune, India
  6. 6
    Saint Mary’s Hospital for Women & Children, Manchester, UK
  1. Dr M Zulf Mughal, Department of Paediatric Medicine, Saint Mary’s Hospital for Women & Children, Hathersage Road, Manchester M13 0JH, UK; zulf.mughal{at}cmmc.nhs.uk

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We recently reported that 73% of adolescent girls attending an inner city school in Manchester, UK had hypovitaminosis D (serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration <30 nmol/l). However, none of the subjects had clinical features of vitamin D deficiency or disturbance of their serum calcium or inorganic phosphate concentrations.1 Rajeswari et al2 have suggested that low dietary calcium intake, which is common in many parts of India, exacerbates symptoms of vitamin D deficiency.

We studied 50 post-menarchal girls from a state-run school in Pune, India during February 2006, using a similar protocol to that …

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