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Community child health and child public health joint session

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G244 IS EXERCISE AN EFFECTIVE TREATMENT FOR CHILDHOOD OBESITY? A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW

L. Taylor.University Of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK

Aims: To systematically review the evidence for the effectiveness of exercise in the treatment of childhood obesity

Methodology: A literature search of Medline, Cinhal, Cochrane, Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN), and Embase was undertaken. One hundred and forty articles were identified. The references of these papers were searched, and hand searching of appropriate journals was undertaken. Eligibility was assessed using abstracts or full texts if required. The studies were then graded according to the risk of bias—high, medium, or low. There were 27 eligible studies and the data was extracted using critical appraisal proforma. A meta-analysis was unable to be performed due to the heterogenicity of the studies.

Results: The studies were split into two groups, those whose primary outcome measures were change in body weight, body mass index or percentage body fat and those that looked at the effect of exercise on the complications of obesity. The only high quality study in the first group showed a significant decrease in body fat percentage with and exercise programme. The three high quality studies in the second group found significant decreases in blood lipid concentrations and vascular function after exercise.

Conclusions: There is some weak evidence to suggest that exercise can be beneficial in improving body composition but none of the studies are ideal in methodology and there is an urgent need for well designed randomised controlled trials which look at representative study populations, use international definitions to identify obesity and which use standardised, realistic exercise regimes.

G245 WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS OF EARLY PUBERTAL DEVELOPMENT? FINDINGS IN ADULTHOOD FROM A NATIONAL BIRTH COHORT

R. Viner1, T. Cole2, B. Taylor1.1Royal Free and University College Medical School, University College London, London, UK; 2Institute of Child Health, University College London, London, UK

Aims: There is some evidence to show that puberty is occurring earlier …

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