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Arch Dis Child 91:777-778 doi:10.1136/adc.2005.091280
  • Short report

Surveillance of insecticide resistance in head lice using biochemical and molecular methods

  1. D Rh Thomas1,
  2. L McCarroll2,
  3. R Roberts3,
  4. P Karunaratne2,
  5. C Roberts3,
  6. D Casey3,
  7. S Morgan4,
  8. K Touhig5,
  9. J Morgan2,
  10. F Collins6,
  11. J Hemingway2
  1. 1National Public Health Service for Wales Communicable Disease Surveillance Centre, Cardiff, UK
  2. 2Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, Liverpool, UK
  3. 3National Public Health Service for Wales Infection and Communicable Disease Service, North Wales Health Protection Team, Mold, Flintshire, UK
  4. 4National Public Health Service for Wales Infection and Communicable Disease Mid and West Wales Health Protection Team, St Davids Hospital, Carmarthen, UK
  5. 5National Public Health Service for Wales Infection and Communicable Disease Service South East Wales Health Protection Team, Temple of Peace & Health, Cardiff, UK
  6. 6Welsh Assembly Government, Cathays Park, Cardiff, UK
  1. Correspondence to:
    Dr D Thomas
    National Public Health Service for Wales Communicable Disease Surveillance Centre, Abton House, Wedal Road, Cardiff CF14 3QX, UK; Daniel.Thomas{at}nphs.wales.nhs.uk
  • Accepted 18 May 2006
  • Published Online First 14 June 2006

Abstract

Treatment of head louse infection is primarily through topical insecticides. However, there is growing evidence of resistance. A representative population sample was tested using biochemical and molecular methods; it was shown that, in Wales, treatments containing pyrethroids are likely to be less effective in controlling head louse infection than those containing organophosphates.

Footnotes

  • Competing interests: none

  • Published Online First 14 June 2006