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Scope for improvement: hospital wide sedation practice at a children’s hospital
  1. F E Babl1,
  2. J Munro2,
  3. G Kainey3,
  4. G M Palmer4,
  5. A Iser5
  1. 1Emergency Department, Royal Children’s Hospital and Murdoch Children’s Research Institute, Melbourne, Australia
  2. 2Department of General Medicine, Royal Children’s Hospital and Murdoch Children’s Research Institute, Melbourne, Australia
  3. 3Clinical Support Service, Royal Children’s Hospital and Murdoch Children’s Research Institute, Melbourne, Australia
  4. 4Department of Anaesthesia and Pain Management Service, Royal Children’s Hospital and Murdoch Children’s Research Institute, Melbourne, Australia
  5. 5Department of General Medicine, Royal Children’s Hospital and Murdoch Children’s Research Institute, Melbourne, Australia
  1. Correspondence to:
    Dr F E Babl
    Consultant in Emergency Medicine, Emergency Department, Royal Children’s Hospital, Parkville, Victoria 3055, Australia; franz.babl{at}rch.org.au

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Procedural sedation by non-anaesthesia staff is frequently required in children, yet even “safe” agents can be associated with serious adverse events.1 Professional societies and professional bodies have published sedation guidelines in a number of countries.2 However, no data exist about the characteristics of sedation practice from a hospital wide perspective. We set out to determine the spectrum and quality of procedural sedation performed by non-anaesthesia staff at a tertiary paediatric hospital.

All episodes of procedural sedation by non-anaesthesia staff outside intensive care units were prospectively tracked over three weeks in 2004 …

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