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Clinical and laboratory characteristics of non-E coli urinary tract infections
  1. S Friedman1,
  2. S Reif1,
  3. A Assia1,
  4. I Levy2
  1. 1Department of Pediatrics, Dana Children’s Hospital, Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv, Israel
  2. 2Infectious Disease Unit, Schneider Children’s Medical Center of Israel, Petah Tiqva, and Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel
  1. Correspondence to:
    Dr I Levy
    Infectious Disease Unit, Schneider Children’s Medical Center of Israel, Petah Tiqva 49202, Israel; itzhakl{at}clalit.org.il; lavyguy{at}bezeqint.net

Abstract

Comparison of the clinical and laboratory characteristics of infants and children with urinary tract infection caused by E coli (n = 107) or other pathogens (n = 32) yielded a significantly higher association of non-E coli disease with urinary tract anomalies, younger age, and previous antibiotic treatment. Underlying urinary tract anomalies were noted in 18 patients, of whom 14 (77%) were infected by non-E coli pathogens. The most frequent anomaly was grade 3–4 vesicoureteral reflux (50%), followed by hydronephrosis (22.7%), ureteropelvic junction obstruction (9%), hypospadias (4.5%), pinpoint meatus (4.5%), and dysplastic kidney (4.5%).

  • non-E-coli
  • UTI
  • infants

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Footnotes

  • Published Online First 22 May 2006

  • Competing interests: none declared

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